Spirit Airlines, Inc.
Spirit Airlines, Inc. (Form: 10-K, Received: 02/18/2015 15:19:03)


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 
(Mark One)
þ
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
or
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from             to            
Commission File No. 001-35186  
Spirit Airlines, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
 
 
Delaware
 
38-1747023
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
2800 Executive Way Miramar, Florida
 
33025
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)

(954) 447-7920
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
 
 
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Voting Common Stock, $0.0001 par value Non-Voting Common Stock, $0.0001 par value
 
NASDAQ Global Select Market None
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes   þ     No   ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes   ¨     No   þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes   þ     No   ¨
Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes   þ     No   ¨




Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer   þ      Accelerated filer     ¨       Non-accelerated filer    ¨      Smaller reporting company   ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes   ¨     No   þ
The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $4.6 billion computed by reference to the last sale price of the common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2014, the last trading day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. Shares held by each executive officer, director and by certain persons that own 10 percent or more of the outstanding Common Stock have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.
The number of shares of each registrant's classes of common stock outstanding as of the close of business on February 6, 2015:

Class
Number of Shares
Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share
72,775,915

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of the registrant's Proxy Statement for the registrant's 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K to the extent stated herein. The Proxy Statement will be filed within 120 days of the registrant's fiscal year ended December 31, 2014 .






TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PART I
Page
PART II
 
PART III
 
PART IV
 
 
__________________________________________________ 
 





PART I
ITEM 1.    BUSINESS
Overview
Spirit Airlines is an ultra low-cost, low-fare airline based in Miramar, Florida that offers affordable travel to price-conscious customers. Our all-Airbus fleet currently operates more than 300 daily flights to 56 destinations in the United States, Caribbean and Latin America. Our stock trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Stock Market under the symbol "SAVE."

Our ultra low-cost carrier, or ULCC, business model allows us to compete principally by offering customers our Bare Fares TM , which are unbundled base fares that remove components traditionally included. We then give customers Frill Control TM , which provides customers the freedom to save by paying only for the options they choose such as bags, advance seat assignments and refreshments, which we record in our financial statements as non-ticket revenue.
Our History and Corporate Information
We were founded in 1964 as Clippert Trucking Company, a Michigan corporation. We began air charter operations in 1990 and renamed ourselves Spirit Airlines, Inc. in 1992. In 1994, we reincorporated in Delaware, and in 1999 we relocated our headquarters to Miramar, Florida.
Our mailing address and executive offices are located at 2800 Executive Way, Miramar, Florida 33025, and our telephone number at that address is (954) 447-7920. We are subject to the information and periodic reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or Exchange Act, and, in accordance therewith, file periodic reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission or SEC. Such periodic reports, proxy statements and other information are available for inspection and copying at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549 or may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains a website at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. We also post on the Investor Relations page of our website, www.spirit.com , a link to our filings with the SEC, our Corporate Governance Guidelines and Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, which applies to all directors and all our employees, and the charters of our Audit, Compensation, Finance and Nominating and Corporate Governance committees. Our filings with the SEC are posted as soon as reasonably practical after they are filed electronically with the SEC. Please note that information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference in, or considered to be a part of, this report. You can also obtain copies of these documents free of charge by writing to us at: Corporate Secretary, Spirit Airlines, Inc., 2800 Executive Way, Miramar, Florida 33025.
Our Business Model

Our ULCC business model provides customers very low, unbundled base fares with a range of optional services, allowing customers the freedom to choose only the options they value. The success of our model is driven by our low cost structure, which permits us to offer very low base fares while maintaining one of the highest profit margins in the industry.
We are focused on price-sensitive travelers who pay for their own travel, and our business model is designed to deliver what we believe our customers want: low fares. We aggressively use low fares to stimulate air travel demand in order to increase passenger volume, load factors and non-ticket revenue on the flights we operate. Higher passenger volumes and load factors help us sell more ancillary products and services, which in turn allows us to reduce the base fare we offer even further, stimulating additional demand. We strive to be recognized by our customers and potential customers as the low-fare leader in the markets we serve.
We compete based on total price. We believe other airlines have used an all-inclusive price concept to effectively raise total prices to consumers, rather than lowering fares by unbundling each product or service. For example, carriers that tout “free bags” have included the cost of checking bags in the total ticket price, which does not allow passengers to see how much they would save if they did not check luggage. We believe that we and our customers benefit when we allow our customers to know the total price of their travel by breaking out the cost of optional products or services. Customers booking through our website are easily able to compare the total cost of flying with us versus flying with another airline.
We allow our customers to see all available options and their respective prices prior to purchasing a ticket, and this full transparency illustrates that our total price, including options selected, is lower than other airlines on average. In 2014, we launched an aggressive new brand campaign to educate the public on how Spirit's unbundled pricing model works and how that gives them choice and saves them money compared to other airlines.

4



Our Strengths
We believe we compete successfully in the airline industry by leveraging the following demonstrated business strengths:
Ultra-Low Cost Structure . Our unit operating costs are among the lowest of all airlines operating in the Americas. We believe this cost advantage helps protect our market position and enables us to offer some of the lowest base fares in our markets, sustain among the highest operating margins in our industry and support continued growth. Our operating costs per available seat mile (CASM) of 9.65 cent s in 2014 , were significantly lower than those of the major domestic network carriers and among the lowest of the domestic low-cost carriers. We achieve these low unit operating costs in large part due to:
high aircraft utilization;
high-density seating configurations on our aircraft, which is part of our Plane Simple TM strategy with its dense seating configurations and simplified onboard product designed to lower costs;
no hub-and-spoke inefficiencies;
highly productive workforce;
opportunistic outsourcing of operating functions;
operating our Fit Fleet TM , a modern single fleet type of Airbus A320-family aircraft with common flight crews across it;
reduced sales, marketing and distribution costs through direct-to-consumer marketing;
efficient flight scheduling, including minimal ground times between flights; and
a company-wide business culture that is keenly focused on driving costs lower.
Innovative Revenue Generation . We execute our innovative, unbundled pricing strategy to produce significant non-ticket revenue generation, which allows us to stimulate passenger demand for our product by lowering base fares and enabling passengers to identify, select and pay for the products and services they want to use. Our unbundled strategy has enabled us to grow average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment from approximately $5 in 2006 to $55 in 2014 by:
charging for checked and carry-on baggage;
passing through all distribution-related expenses;
charging for premium seats and advance seat selection;
enforcing ticketing policies, including service charges for changes and cancellations;
generating subscription revenue from our $9 Fare Club ultra low-fare subscription service;
deriving brand-based revenues from proprietary services, such as our FREE SPIRIT affinity credit card program;
offering third-party travel products (travel packages), such as hotel rooms, ground transportation (rental and hotel shuttle products) and attractions (show or theme park tickets) packaged with air travel;
selling third-party travel insurance through our website; and
selling in-flight products and onboard advertising.
Resilient Business Model and Customer Base . By focusing on price-sensitive travelers, we have maintained relatively stable unit revenue and profitability during volatile economic periods because we are not highly dependent on premium-fare business traffic. We believe our growing customer base is more resilient than the customer bases of most other airlines because our low fares and unbundled service offering appeal to price-sensitive travelers. For example, in 2009, when premium-fare business traffic dried up due to the economic recession, our operating revenue per available seat mile (RASM) declined 1.9%, compared to an average U.S. airline industry decline of over 9%.
Well Positioned for Growth . We have developed a substantial network of destinations in profitable U.S. domestic niche markets, targeted growth markets in the Caribbean and Latin America and high-volume routes flown by price-sensitive travelers. In the United States, we also have grown into large markets that, due to higher fares, have priced out those more price-sensitive travelers. Our strategy to balance growth in large domestic markets, niche markets and opportunities in the Caribbean and Latin America gives us a significant number of growth opportunities.
Experienced International Operator. We believe we have substantial experience in foreign local aviation, security and customs regulations, local ground operations and flight crew training required for successful international and overwater flight operations. All of our aircraft are certified for overwater operations. We believe we compete favorably against other low-cost

5



carriers because we have been conducting international flight operations since 2003 and have developed substantial experience in complying with the various regulations and business practices in the international markets we serve. During 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , no revenue from any one foreign country represented greater than 4% of the our total passenger revenue. We attribute operating revenues by geographic region based upon the origin and destination of each passenger flight segment.
Financial Strength Achieved with Focus on Cost Discipline . We believe our ULCC business model has delivered strong financial results in both favorable and more difficult economic times. We have generated these results by:
keeping a consistent focus on maintaining low unit operating costs;
ensuring our sourcing arrangements with key third parties are regularly benchmarked against the best industry standards;
generating and maintaining an adequate level of liquidity to insulate against volatility in key cost inputs, such as fuel, and in passenger demand that may occur as a result of changing general economic conditions.
Route Network
As of December 31, 2014 , our route network included 151 markets served by 56 airports throughout North America, Central America, South America and the Caribbean.
Below is a route map of our current network, which includes seasonal routes and routes announced as of February 6, 2015 for which service has not yet started:
Our network expansion targets underserved and/or overpriced markets. We utilize a rigorous process to identify growth opportunities to deploy new aircraft where we believe they will be most profitable. To monitor the profitability of each route, we analyze weekly and monthly profitability reports as well as near term forecasting.

6



Competition
The airline industry is highly competitive. The principal competitive factors in the airline industry are fare pricing, total price, flight schedules, aircraft type, passenger amenities, number of routes served from a city, customer service, safety record and reputation, code-sharing relationships and frequent flier programs and redemption opportunities. Our competitors and potential competitors include traditional network airlines, low-cost carriers, and regional airlines. We typically compete in markets served by traditional network airlines and other low-cost carriers, and, to a lesser extent, regional airlines.
Our single largest overlap, at approximately 51% of our markets as of January 12, 2015, is with American Airlines. Our principal competitors on domestic routes are American Airlines, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines and Delta Air Lines. Our principal competitors for service from South Florida to our markets in the Caribbean and Latin America are American Airlines through its hub in Miami and JetBlue Airways through its operations in Fort Lauderdale. Our principal competitive advantages are our low base fares and our focus on the price-sensitive traveler who pays his or her own travel costs. These low base fares are facilitated by our low unit operating costs, which in 2014 were among the lowest in the airline industry. We believe our low costs coupled with our non-ticket revenues allow us to price our fares at levels where we can be profitable while our primary competitors cannot.
The airline industry is particularly susceptible to price discounting because, once a flight is scheduled, airlines incur only nominal incremental costs to provide service to passengers occupying otherwise unsold seats. The expenses of a scheduled aircraft flight do not vary significantly with the number of passengers carried and, as a result, a relatively small change in the number of passengers or in pricing could have a disproportionate effect on an airline’s operating and financial results. Price competition occurs on a market-by-market basis through price discounts, changes in pricing structures, fare matching, target promotions and frequent flier initiatives. Airlines typically use discount fares and other promotions to stimulate traffic during normally slower travel periods to generate cash flow and to maximize RASM. The prevalence of discount fares can be particularly acute when a competitor has excess capacity that it is unable to fill at higher rates. A key element to our competitive strategy is to maintain very low unit costs in order to permit us to compete successfully in price-sensitive markets.

Seasonality

Our business is subject to significant seasonal fluctuations. We generally expect demand to be greater in the second and third quarters compared to the rest of the year. The air transportation business is also volatile and highly affected by economic cycles and trends.
Distribution

The majority of our tickets are sold through direct channels including online via www.spirit.com , our call center and the ticket counter, with spirit.com being the primary channel. We also partner with a number of third parties to distribute our tickets, including online and traditional travel agents and electronic global distribution systems.
Customers

We believe our customers are primarily leisure travelers who make their purchase decision based on price. By focusing on lowering our cost structure, we can successfully sell tickets at low fares while maintaining a strong profit margin.
Customer Service
We are committed to taking care of our customers. We believe focusing on customer service in every aspect of our operations including personnel, flight equipment, in-flight and ancillary amenities, on-time performance, flight completion ratios, and baggage handling will strengthen customer loyalty and attract new customers. We proactively aim to improve our operations to ensure further improvement in customer service.
In response to customer and other demands, we modified our online booking process to allow our customers to see all available options and their prices prior to purchasing a ticket, and have initiated a campaign that illustrates our total prices are lower, on average, than our competitors, even when options are included.
Fleet
We fly only Airbus A320 family aircraft, which provides us significant operational and cost advantages compared to airlines that operate multiple aircraft types. By operating a single aircraft type, we avoid the incremental costs of training crews across multiple types. Flight crews are entirely interchangeable across all of our aircraft, and maintenance, spare parts inventories and other operational support remains highly simplified compared to those airlines with more complex fleets. Due

7



to this commonality among Airbus single-aisle aircraft, we can retain the benefits of a fleet comprised of a single type of aircraft while still having the flexibility to match the capacity and range of the aircraft to the demands of each route.
As of December 31, 2014 , we had a fleet of 65 Airbus single-aisle aircraft, consisting of 29 A319s, 34 A320s and 2 A321s, and the average age of the fleet was 5.1 years. As of December 31, 2014 , we had 4 aircraft financed through senior and junior long-term debt with terms of 12 and 7 years, respectively, and 61 aircraft financed under operating leases with expirations between 2016 and 2025 .
As of December 31, 2014 , firm aircraft orders consisted of 101 A320 family aircraft ( 21 of the existing A320 aircraft model, 40 A320neos, 30 of the existing A321 model and 10 A321neos) with Airbus and 5 direct operating leases for A320neos with a third-party lessor. As of December 31, 2014 , spare engine orders consisted of five V2500 SelectOne engines with IAE and nine PurePower PW 1100G-JM engines with Pratt & Whitney. Aircraft are scheduled for delivery from 2015 through 2021 and spare engines are scheduled for delivery from 2015 through 2024 . The firm aircraft orders provide for capacity growth as well as the flexibility to replace all or some of the 65 aircraft in our present fleet. We may elect to supplement these deliveries by additional acquisitions from the manufacturer or in the open market if demand conditions merit.
Consistent with our ULCC business model, each of our aircraft is configured with a high density seating configuration, which helps us maintain a lower unit cost and pass savings to our customers. Our A319s accommodate 145 passengers (compared to 128 on United and American Airlines), our A320s accommodate 178 passengers (compared to currently 150 on United and JetBlue) and our A321s accommodate 218 passengers (compared to a current maximum of 181 on American Airlines and 190 on JetBlue).
Maintenance and Repairs
We have a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mandated and approved maintenance program, which is administered by our technical services department. Our maintenance technicians undergo extensive initial and ongoing training to ensure the safety of our aircraft.
Aircraft maintenance and repair consists of routine and non-routine maintenance, and work performed is divided into three general categories: line maintenance, heavy maintenance and component service. Line maintenance consists of routine daily and weekly scheduled maintenance checks on our aircraft, including pre-flight, daily, weekly and overnight checks, and any diagnostics and routine repairs and any unscheduled items on an as needed basis. Line maintenance events are currently serviced by in-house mechanics supplemented by contract labor and are primarily completed at airports we currently serve. Heavy airframe maintenance checks consist of a series of more complex tasks that can take from one to four weeks to accomplish and typically are required approximately every 24 months. Heavy engine maintenance is performed approximately every four to six years and includes a more complex scope of work. Due to our relatively small fleet size and projected fleet growth, we believe outsourcing all of our heavy maintenance activity, such as engine servicing, major part repair and component service repairs is more economical. Outsourcing eliminates the substantial initial capital requirements inherent in heavy aircraft maintenance. We have entered into a long-term flight hour agreement for our current fleet and future deliveries with IAE and Pratt & Whitney for our engine overhaul services and Lufthansa Technik on an hour-by-hour basis for component services. We outsource our heavy airframe maintenance to FAA-qualified maintenance providers.
Our recent maintenance expenses have been lower than what we expect to incur in the future because of the relatively young age of our aircraft fleet. Our maintenance costs are expected to increase as the scope of repairs increases with the increasing age of our fleet. As our aircraft age, scheduled scope of work and frequency of unscheduled maintenance events is likely to increase like any maturing fleet. Our aircraft utilization rate could decrease with the increase in aircraft maintenance.
Employees
Our business is labor intensive, with labor costs representing approximately 19.9% , 19.1% and 19.1% of our total operating costs for 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively. As of December 31, 2014 , we had 1,035 pilots, 1,490 flight attendants, 26 flight dispatchers, 396 mechanics, 883 airport agents/other and 389 employees in administrative roles for a total of 4,219 employees. As of December 31, 2014 , approximately 67% of our employees were represented by four labor unions. On an average full-time equivalent basis, for the full year 2014 , we had 3,722 employees, compared to 3,224 in 2013 .
FAA regulations require pilots to have commercial licenses with specific ratings for the aircraft to be flown and be medically certified as physically fit to fly. FAA and medical certifications are subject to periodic renewal requirements, including recurrent training and recent flying experience. Mechanics, quality-control inspectors and flight dispatchers must be certificated and qualified for specific aircraft. Flight attendants must have initial and periodic competency training and qualification. Training programs are subject to approval and monitoring by the FAA. Management personnel directly involved in the supervision of flight operations, training, maintenance and aircraft inspection must also meet experience standards

8



prescribed by FAA regulations. All safety-sensitive employees are subject to pre-employment, random and post-accident drug testing.
The Railway Labor Act, or RLA, governs our relations with labor organizations. Under the RLA, our collective bargaining agreements generally do not expire, but instead become amendable as of a stated date. If either party wishes to modify the terms of any such agreement, they must notify the other party in the manner agreed to by the parties. Under the RLA, after receipt of such notice, the parties must meet for direct negotiations. If no agreement is reached, either party may request the National Mediation Board, or NMB, to appoint a federal mediator. The RLA prescribes no set timetable for the direct negotiation and mediation process. It is not unusual for those processes to last for many months, and even for a few years. If no agreement is reached in mediation, the NMB in its discretion may declare at some time that an impasse exists. If an impasse is declared, the NMB proffers binding arbitration to the parties. Either party may decline to submit to arbitration. If arbitration is rejected by either party, a 30-day “cooling off” period commences. During that period (or after), a Presidential Emergency Board, or PEB, may be established, which examines the parties’ positions and recommends a solution. The PEB process lasts for 30 days and is followed by another “cooling off” period of 30 days. At the end of a “cooling off” period, unless an agreement is reached or action is taken by Congress, the labor organization and the airline each may resort to “self-help,” including, for the labor organization, a strike or other labor action, and for the airline, the imposition of any or all of its proposed amendments and the hiring of new employees to replace any striking workers. Congress and the President have the authority to prevent “self-help” by enacting legislation that, among other things, imposes a settlement on the parties. The table below sets forth our employee groups and status of the collective bargaining agreements.
Employee Groups
  
Representative
  
Amendable Date
Pilots
  
Air Line Pilots Association, International (ALPA)
  
August 2015
Flight Attendants
  
Association of Flight Attendants (AFA-CWA)
  
August 2007
Dispatchers
  
Transport Workers Union (TWU)
  
August 2018
Ramp Service Agents
 
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM)
 
TBD
In August 2014, under the supervision of the NMB, we reached a tentative agreement with the AFA-CWA for a five -year contract with the Company's flight attendants. The tentative agreement was subject to ratification by the flight attendant membership. On October 1, 2014, we were notified that the flight attendants voted not to ratify the tentative agreement. We will continue to work together with the AFA-CWA and the NMB with a goal of reaching a mutually beneficial agreement. On July 8, 2014, approximately 250 ramp service agents directly employed by the Company voted to be represented by the IAM. As of December 31, 2014, these ramp service agents served 4 of the 56 airports where we operate. We have begun the process of negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with the IAM.
We focus on hiring highly productive employees and, where feasible, designing systems and processes around automation and outsourcing in order to maintain our low cost base.
Safety and Security
We are committed to the safety and security of our passengers and employees. We strive to comply with or exceed health and safety regulation standards. In pursuing these goals, we maintain an active aviation safety program. All of our personnel are expected to participate in the program and take an active role in the identification, reduction and elimination of hazards.
Our ongoing focus on safety relies on training our employees to proper standards and providing them with the tools and equipment they require so they can perform their job functions in a safe and efficient manner. Safety in the workplace targets several areas of our business including: flight operations, maintenance, in-flight, dispatch and station operations. The Transportation Security Administration, or TSA, is charged with aviation security for both airlines and airports. We maintain active, open lines of communication with the TSA at all of our locations to ensure proper standards for security of our personnel, customers, equipment and facilities are exercised throughout our business.
Insurance
We maintain insurance policies we believe are customary in the airline industry and as required by the Department of Transportation (DOT). The policies principally provide liability coverage for public and passenger injury; damage to property; loss of or damage to flight equipment; fire and extended coverage; directors’ and officers’ liability; advertiser and media liability; cyber risk liability; fiduciary; and workers’ compensation and employer’s liability. As of July 2014, we obtained third-party war risk (terrorism) insurance from the commercial market. Previous to this date, we obtained this insurance through a special program administered by the FAA, which was discontinued in late 2014. Renewing coverage from commercial underwriters could result in a change in premium and more restrictive terms. Although we currently believe our insurance

9



coverage is adequate, there can be no assurance that the amount of such coverage will not be changed or that we will not be forced to bear substantial losses from accidents.
Management Information Systems
We have continued our commitment to technology improvements to support our ongoing operations and initiatives. During 2013, we completed the integration of a new SAP Enterprise Resource Planning application, which replaced our general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, cash management and fixed asset systems. The conversion was designed to improve our key business processes by implementing an integrated tool to increase efficiency, consistency, data accuracy and cost effectiveness. During 2014, and continuing through 2015, we are implementing a new scalable maintenance, repair, operations (MRO) system. This system will improve the tracking of all maintenance related financial transactions.
Foreign Ownership
Under DOT regulations and federal law, we must be controlled by U.S. citizens. In order to qualify, at least 75% of our stock must be voted by U.S. citizens, and our president and at least two-thirds of our board of directors and senior management must be U.S. citizens.
We believe we are currently in compliance with such foreign ownership rules.
Government Regulation
Operational Regulation
The airline industry is heavily regulated, especially by the federal government. Two of the primary regulatory authorities overseeing air transportation in the United States are the DOT and the FAA. The DOT has jurisdiction over economic issues affecting air transportation, such as competition, route authorizations, advertising and sales practices, baggage liability and disabled passenger transportation, among other areas, several of which were included in rules that became effective in 2011 and 2012 relating to, among other things, how airlines handle interactions with passengers through advertising, the reservation process, at the airport and on board the aircraft. Additional consumer rules proposed in 2014 that would require airlines to disclose through all points of sale the fees for certain basic ancillary services associated with the air transportation consumers are buying or considering buying may be implemented in 2015. Additional disabled passenger rules may be proposed in 2015. See “Risk Factors—Restrictions on or increased taxes applicable to charges for ancillary products and services paid by airline passengers and burdensome consumer protection regulations or laws could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.”
The DOT has authority to issue certificates of public convenience and necessity required for airlines to provide air transportation. We hold a DOT certificate of public convenience and necessity authorizing us to engage in scheduled air transportation of passengers, property and mail within the United States, its territories and possessions and between the United States and all countries that maintain a liberal aviation trade relationship with the United States (known as “open skies” countries). We also hold DOT certificates to engage in air transportation to certain other countries with more restrictive aviation policies.
The FAA is responsible for regulating and overseeing matters relating to air carrier flight operations, including airline operating certificates, aircraft certification and maintenance and other matters affecting air safety. The FAA requires each commercial airline to obtain and hold an FAA air carrier certificate. This certificate, in combination with operations specifications issued to the airline by the FAA, authorizes the airline to operate at specific airports using aircraft approved by the FAA. As of December 31, 2014 , we had FAA airworthiness certificates for all of our aircraft, we had obtained the necessary FAA authority to fly to all of the cities we currently serve, and all of our aircraft had been certified for overwater operations. In 2014, the FAA issued its final regulations governing pilot rest periods and work hours for all airlines certificated under Part 121 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The rule, known as FAR 117 which became effective on January 4, 2014, impacts the required amount and timing of rest periods for pilots between work assignments, and modifies duty and rest requirements based on the time of day, number of scheduled segments, flight types, time zones and other factors. FAR 117 has resulted in increased pilot costs as we were required to hire more pilots in order to comply with the regulations. We believe we hold all necessary operating and airworthiness authorizations, certificates and licenses and are operating in compliance with applicable DOT and FAA regulations, interpretations and policies.
International Regulation
All international service is subject to the regulatory requirements of the foreign government involved. We currently operate international service to Aruba, the Bahamas, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru and St. Maarten, as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin

10



Islands. If we decide to increase our routes to additional international destinations, we will be required to obtain necessary authority from the DOT and the applicable foreign government. We are also required to comply with overfly regulations in countries that lay along our routes but which we do not serve.
International service is also subject to Customs and Border Protection, or CBP, immigration and agriculture requirements and the requirements of equivalent foreign governmental agencies. Like other airlines flying international routes, from time to time we may be subject to civil fines and penalties imposed by CBP if unmanifested or illegal cargo, such as illegal narcotics, is found on our aircraft. These fines and penalties, which in the case of narcotics are based upon the retail value of the seizure, may be substantial. We have implemented a comprehensive security program at our airports to reduce the risk of illegal cargo being placed on our aircraft, and we seek to cooperate actively with CBP and other U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies in investigating incidents or attempts to introduce illegal cargo.
Security Regulation
The TSA was created in 2001 with the responsibility and authority to oversee the implementation, and ensure the adequacy, of security measures at airports and other transportation facilities. Funding for passenger security is provided in part by a per enplanement ticket tax (passenger security fee). For the first half of 2014, this fee was $2.50 per passenger flight segment, subject to a $5 per one-way trip cap. Effective July 1, 2014, the security fee was set at a flat rate of $5.60 each way. On December 19, 2014 a new law took effect which limits a round-trip fee to $11.20. We cannot forecast what additional security and safety requirements may be imposed in the future or the costs or revenue impact that would be associated with complying with such requirements. In addition, for the majority of 2014, the TSA assessed an Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee, or ASIF, on each airline. This fee was eliminated by the TSA effective October 1, 2014.
Environmental Regulation
We are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment and affecting matters such as aircraft engine emissions, aircraft noise emissions and the discharge or disposal of materials and chemicals, which laws and regulations are administered by numerous state and federal agencies. The Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, regulates operations, including air carrier operations, which affect the quality of air in the United States. We believe the aircraft in our fleet meet all emission standards issued by the EPA. Concern about climate change and greenhouse gases may result in additional regulation or taxation of aircraft emissions in the United States and abroad.
Federal law recognizes the right of airport operators with special noise problems to implement local noise abatement procedures so long as those procedures do not interfere unreasonably with interstate and foreign commerce and the national air transportation system. These restrictions can include limiting nighttime operations, directing specific aircraft operational procedures during takeoff and initial climb, and limiting the overall number of flights at an airport.
Other Regulations
We are subject to certain provisions of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and are required to obtain an aeronautical radio license from the Federal Communications Commission, or FCC. To the extent we are subject to FCC requirements, we will take all necessary steps to comply with those requirements. We are also subject to state and local laws and regulations at locations where we operate and the regulations of various local authorities that operate the airports we serve.
Future Regulations
The U.S. and foreign governments may consider and adopt new laws, regulations, interpretations and policies regarding a wide variety of matters that could directly or indirectly affect our results of operations. We cannot predict what laws, regulations, interpretations and policies might be considered in the future, nor can we judge what impact, if any, the implementation of any of these proposals or changes might have on our business.

11



ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS
    
Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This Annual Report on Form 10-K includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the Securities Act), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act). Forward-looking statements may include words such as “believe,” “may,” “estimate,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “expect,” “predict,” “potential” and similar expressions indicating future results or expectations, as they relate to our company, our business and our management, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements should not be read as guarantees of future performance or results, and will not necessarily be accurate indications of the times at, or by, which such performance or results will be achieved, if at all. Forward-looking statements are based on information available at the time those statements are made and/or management's good faith belief as of that time with respect to future events, and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual performance or results to differ materially from those expressed in or suggested by the forward-looking statements. Therefore, actual results may differ materially from what is expressed in or indicated by our forward-looking statements or from historical experience or our present expectations. Known material risk factors that could cause these differences are set forth below under "Risk Factors." Additional risks or uncertainties (i) that are not currently known to us, (ii) that we currently deem to be immaterial, or (iii) that could apply to any company, could also materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, or future results. You should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information in this report. If any of the following risks materialize, our business could be materially harmed, and our financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. References in this report to “Spirit,” “we,” “us,” “our,” or the “Company” shall mean Spirit Airlines, Inc., unless the context indicates otherwise.

Risks Related to Our Industry
We operate in an extremely competitive industry.
We face significant competition with respect to routes, fares and services. Within the airline industry, we compete with traditional network airlines, other low-cost airlines and regional airlines on many of our routes. Competition in most of the destinations we presently serve is intense, due to the large number of carriers in those markets. Furthermore, other airlines may begin service or increase existing service on routes where we currently face no or little competition. Most of our competitors are larger and have significantly greater financial and other resources than we do.
The airline industry is particularly susceptible to price discounting because once a flight is scheduled, airlines incur only nominal additional costs to provide service to passengers occupying otherwise unsold seats. Increased fare or other price competition could adversely affect our operations. Moreover, many other airlines have begun to unbundle services by charging separately for services such as baggage and advance seat selection. This unbundling and other cost reducing measures could enable competitor airlines to reduce fares on routes that we serve.
In addition, airlines increase or decrease capacity in markets based on perceived profitability. Decisions by our competitors that increase overall industry capacity, or capacity dedicated to a particular domestic or foreign region, market or route, could have a material adverse impact on our business. If a traditional network airline were to successfully develop a low-cost structure or if we were to experience increased competition from other low-cost carriers, our business could be materially adversely affected.
All of the domestic traditional network airlines have on one or more occasions initiated bankruptcy proceedings in attempts to restructure their debt and other obligations and reduce their operating costs. On November 29, 2011, AMR Corporation and substantially all of its subsidiaries, including American Airlines, Inc., filed a petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. In December 2013, AMR Corporation and US Airways Group, Inc. completed a merger and formally became American Airlines Group Inc. We presently compete with American Airlines in a majority of our markets. We cannot predict the extent to which this merger will result in a more effective competitor with us.
Our growth and the success of our ULCC business model could stimulate competition in our markets through our competitors’ development of their own ULCC strategies or new market entrants. Any such competitor may have greater financial resources and access to cheaper sources of capital than we do, which could enable them to operate their business with a lower cost structure than we can. If these competitors adopt and successfully execute a ULCC business model, we could be materially adversely affected.

12



There has been significant consolidation within the airline industry including, for example, the combinations of American Airlines and US Airways, Delta Air Lines and Northwest Airlines, United Airlines and Continental Airlines and Southwest Airlines and AirTran Airways. In the future, there may be additional consolidation in our industry. Any business combination could significantly alter industry conditions and competition within the airline industry and could cause fares of our competitors to be reduced.
The extremely competitive nature of the airline industry could prevent us from attaining the level of passenger traffic or maintaining the level of fares or revenues related to ancillary services required to sustain profitable operations in new and existing markets and could impede our growth strategy, which could harm our operating results. Due to our relatively small size, we are susceptible to a fare war or other competitive activities in one or more of the markets we serve, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Our low cost structure is one of our primary competitive advantages, and many factors could affect our ability to control our costs.
Our low cost structure is one of our primary competitive advantages. However, we have limited control over many of our costs. For example, we have limited control over the price and availability of aircraft fuel, aviation insurance, airport and related infrastructure taxes, the cost of meeting changing regulatory requirements and our cost to access capital or financing. In addition, the compensation and benefit costs applicable to a significant portion of our employees are established by the terms of our collective bargaining agreements. We cannot guarantee we will be able to maintain a cost advantage over our competitors. If our cost structure increases and we are no longer able to maintain a cost advantage over our competitors, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The airline industry is heavily impacted by the price and availability of aircraft fuel. Continued volatility in fuel costs or significant disruptions in the supply of fuel, including hurricanes and other events affecting the Gulf Coast in particular, could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Aircraft fuel costs represent our single largest operating cost, accounting for 38.9% , 40.2% and 41.2% of our total operating expenses for 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively. As such, our operating results are significantly affected by changes in the availability and the cost of aircraft fuel, especially aircraft fuel refined in the U.S. Gulf Coast region, on which we are highly dependent. Both the cost and the availability of aircraft fuel are subject to many meteorological, economic and political factors and events occurring throughout the world, which we can neither control nor accurately predict. For example, a major hurricane making landfall along the Gulf Coast could cause disruption to oil production, refinery operations and pipeline capacity in that region, possibly resulting in significant increases in the price of aircraft fuel and diminished availability of aircraft fuel supplies. Any disruption to oil production, refinery operations, or pipeline capacity in the Gulf Coast region could have a disproportionate impact on our operating results compared to other airlines that have more diversified fuel sources.
Aircraft fuel prices have been subject to high volatility, fluctuating substantially over the past several years. Due to the large proportion of aircraft fuel costs in our total operating cost base, even a relatively small increase in the price of aircraft fuel can have a significant negative impact on our operating costs and on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Our fuel derivative activity may not reduce our fuel costs.
From time to time, we enter into fuel derivative contracts in order to mitigate the risk to our business from future volatility in fuel prices. Our derivatives generally consist of United States Gulf Coast jet fuel swaps (jet fuel swaps) and United States Gulf Coast jet fuel options (jet fuel options). Both jet fuel swaps and jet fuel options are used at times to protect the refining risk between the price of crude oil and the price of refined jet fuel, and to manage the risk of increasing fuel prices. As of December 31, 2014 , we had jet fuel option agreements in place to protect approximately 35% of our 2015 anticipated fuel consumption. There can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into fuel derivative contracts in the future. Our liquidity and general level of capital resources impacts our ability to hedge our fuel requirements. Even if we are able to hedge portions of our future fuel requirements, we cannot guarantee that our derivative contracts will provide sufficient protection against increased fuel costs or that our counterparties will be able to perform under our derivative contracts, such as in the case of a counterparty’s insolvency. Furthermore, our ability to react to the cost of fuel, absent hedging, is limited because we set the price of tickets in advance of incurring fuel costs. Our ability to pass on any significant increases in aircraft fuel costs through fare increases could also be limited. In the event of a reduction in fuel prices compared to our hedged position, our hedged positions could counteract the cost benefit of lower fuel prices and may require us to post cash margin collateral. Please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Trends and Uncertainties Affecting Our Business—Aircraft Fuel.”

13



Restrictions on or increased taxes applicable to charges for ancillary products and services paid by airline passengers and burdensome consumer protection regulations or laws could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
During 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , we generated non-ticket revenues of $786.6 million , $668.4 million and $535.6 million , respectively. Our non-ticket revenues are generated from charges for, among other things, baggage, bookings through certain of our distribution channels, advance seat selection, itinerary changes and loyalty programs. The DOT has rules governing many facets of the airline-consumer relationship, including, for instance, price advertising, tarmac delays, bumping of passengers from flights, ticket refunds and the carriage of disabled passengers. If we are not able to remain in compliance with these rules, the DOT may subject us to fines or other enforcement action, including requirements to modify our passenger reservations system, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. The U.S. Congress and Federal administrative agencies have investigated the increasingly common airline industry practice of unbundling the pricing of certain products and services. If new taxes are imposed on non-ticket revenues, or if other laws or regulations are adopted that make unbundling of airline products and services impermissible, or more cumbersome or expensive, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed. Congressional and other government scrutiny may also change industry practice or public willingness to pay for ancillary services. See also “—We are subject to extensive regulation by the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Transportation and other U.S. and foreign governmental agencies, compliance with which could cause us to incur increased costs and adversely affect our business and financial results.”
The airline industry is particularly sensitive to changes in economic conditions. Continued adverse economic conditions or a reoccurrence of such conditions would negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Our business and the airline industry in general are affected by many changing economic conditions beyond our control, including, among others:
changes and volatility in general economic conditions, including the severity and duration of any downturn in the U.S. or global economy and financial markets;
changes in consumer preferences, perceptions, spending patterns or demographic trends, including any increased preference for higher-fare carriers offering higher amenity levels, and reduced preferences for low-fare carriers offering more basic transportation, during better economic times;
higher levels of unemployment and varying levels of disposable or discretionary income;
depressed housing and stock market prices; and
lower levels of actual or perceived consumer confidence.
These factors can adversely affect, and from time to time have adversely affected, our results of operations, our ability to obtain financing on acceptable terms and our liquidity. Unfavorable general economic conditions, such as higher unemployment rates, a constrained credit market, housing-related pressures and increased focus on reducing business operating costs can reduce spending for price-sensitive leisure and business travel. For many travelers, in particular the price-sensitive travelers we serve, air transportation is a discretionary purchase that they may reduce or eliminate from their spending in difficult economic times. The overall decrease in demand for air transportation in the United States in 2008 and 2009 resulting from record high fuel prices and the economic recession required us to take significant steps to reduce our capacity, which reduced our revenues. Unfavorable economic conditions could also affect our ability to raise prices to counteract increased fuel, labor or other costs, resulting in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The airline industry faces ongoing security concerns and related cost burdens, furthered by threatened or actual terrorist attacks or other hostilities that could significantly harm our industry and our business.
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and their aftermath negatively affected the airline industry. The primary effects experienced by the airline industry included:
substantial loss of revenue and flight disruption costs caused by the grounding of all commercial air traffic in or headed to the United States by the FAA for three days after the terrorist attacks;
increased security and insurance costs;
increased concerns about future terrorist attacks;
airport shutdowns and flight cancellations and delays due to security breaches and perceived safety threats; and

14



significantly reduced passenger traffic and yields due to the subsequent dramatic drop in demand for air travel.
Since September 11, 2001, the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration, or TSA, have implemented numerous security measures that restrict airline operations and increase costs, and are likely to implement additional measures in the future. For example, following the widely publicized attempt of an alleged terrorist to detonate plastic explosives hidden underneath his clothes on a Northwest Airlines flight on Christmas Day in 2009, passengers became subject to enhanced random screening, which included pat-downs, explosive detection testing and body scans. Enhanced passenger screening, increased regulation governing carry-on baggage and other similar restrictions on passenger travel may further increase passenger inconvenience and reduce the demand for air travel. In addition, increased or enhanced security measures have tended to result in higher governmental fees imposed on airlines, resulting in higher operating costs for airlines, which we may not be able to pass on to consumers in the form of higher prices. Any future terrorist attacks or attempted attacks, even if not made directly on the airline industry, or the fear of such attacks or other hostilities (including elevated national threat warnings or selective cancellation or redirection of flights due to terror threats) would likely have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and on the airline industry in general.
Airlines are often affected by factors beyond their control including: air traffic congestion at airports; air traffic control inefficiencies; adverse weather conditions, such as hurricanes or blizzards; increased security measures; new travel related taxes or the outbreak of disease, any of which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.
Like other airlines, our business is affected by factors beyond our control, including air traffic congestion at airports, air traffic control inefficiencies, adverse weather conditions, increased security measures, new travel related taxes and the outbreak of disease. Factors that cause flight delays frustrate passengers and increase costs, which in turn could adversely affect profitability. The federal government singularly controls all U.S. airspace, and airlines are completely dependent on the FAA to operate that airspace in a safe, efficient and affordable manner. The air traffic control system, which is operated by the FAA, faces challenges in managing the growing demand for U.S. air travel. U.S. and foreign air-traffic controllers often rely on outdated technologies that routinely overwhelm the system and compel airlines to fly inefficient, indirect routes resulting in delays. Adverse weather conditions and natural disasters, such as hurricanes affecting southern Florida and the Caribbean as well as other areas of the eastern United States (such as Hurricane Sandy in October 2012), winter snowstorms or the January 2010 earthquakes in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, can cause flight cancellations or significant delays. Cancellations or delays due to adverse weather conditions or natural disasters, air traffic control problems or inefficiencies, breaches in security or other factors could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. Similarly, outbreaks of pandemic or contagious diseases, such as ebola, measles, avian flu, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and H1N1 (swine) flu, could result in significant decreases in passenger traffic and the imposition of government restrictions in service and could have a material adverse impact on the airline industry. Increased travel taxes, such as those provided in the Travel Promotion Act, enacted March 10, 2010, which charges visitors from certain countries a $10 fee every two years to travel into the United States to subsidize certain travel promotion efforts, could also result in decreases in passenger traffic. Any general reduction in airline passenger traffic could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Restrictions on or litigation regarding third-party membership discount programs could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.
We generate a relatively small but growing portion of our revenue from order referral fees, revenue share and other fees paid to us by third-party merchants for customer click-throughs, distribution of third-party promotional materials and referrals arising from products and services of the third-party merchants that we offer to our customers on our website. Some of these third-party referral-based offers are for memberships in discount programs or similar promotions made to customers who have purchased products from us, and for which we receive a payment from the third-party merchants for every customer that accepts the promotion. Certain of these third-party membership discount programs have been the subject of consumer complaints, litigation and regulatory actions alleging that the enrollment and billing practices involved in the programs violate various consumer protection laws or are otherwise deceptive. Any private or governmental claim or action that may be brought against us in the future relating to these third-party membership programs could result in our being obligated to pay damages or incurring legal fees in defending claims. These damages and fees could be disproportionate to the revenues we generate through these relationships. In addition, customer dissatisfaction or a significant reduction in or termination of the third-party membership discount offers on our website as a result of these claims could have a negative impact on our brand, and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We face competition from air travel substitutes.
In addition to airline competition from traditional network airlines, other low-cost airlines and regional airlines, we also face competition from air travel substitutes. On our domestic routes, we face competition from some other transportation

15



alternatives, such as bus, train or automobile. In addition, technology advancements may limit the demand for air travel. For example, video teleconferencing and other methods of electronic communication may reduce the need for in-person communication and add a new dimension of competition to the industry as travelers seek lower-cost substitutes for air travel. If we are unable to adjust rapidly in the event the basis of competition in our markets changes, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Risks Related to Our Business
Increased labor costs, union disputes, employee strikes and other labor-related disruption may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial conditions.
Our business is labor intensive, with labor costs representing approximately 19.9% , 19.1% and 19.1% of our total operating costs for 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively. As of December 31, 2014 , approximately 67% of our workforce was represented by labor unions. We cannot assure you that our labor costs going forward will remain competitive because in the future our labor agreements may be amended or become amendable and new agreements could have terms with higher labor costs; one or more of our competitors may significantly reduce their labor costs, thereby reducing or eliminating our comparative advantages as to one or more of such competitors; or our labor costs may increase in connection with our growth. We may also become subject to additional collective bargaining agreements in the future as non-unionized workers may unionize.
Relations between air carriers and labor unions in the United States are governed by the Railway Labor Act, or the RLA. Under the RLA, collective bargaining agreements generally contain “amendable dates” rather than expiration dates, and the RLA requires that a carrier maintain the existing terms and conditions of employment following the amendable date through a multi-stage and usually lengthy series of bargaining processes overseen by the National Mediation Board, or the NMB. This process continues until either the parties have reached agreement on a new collective bargaining agreement, or the parties have been released to “self-help” by the NMB. In most circumstances, the RLA prohibits strikes; however, after release by the NMB, carriers and unions are free to engage in self-help measures such as lockouts and strikes.
Our flight operations were shut down due to a strike by our pilots beginning on June 12, 2010 and lasting until we and the union representing our pilots reached a tentative agreement for a new contract. Under a Return to Work Agreement, we began to resume flights on June 17, 2010 and resumed our full flight schedule on June 18, 2010. On August 1, 2010, we and the pilots’ union executed a five-year collective bargaining agreement. This agreement becomes amendable in 2015. This shutdown had a material adverse effect on our results of operations for 2010.
We entered into a five-year agreement with our flight dispatchers in August 2013. In August 2014, under the supervision of the NMB, we reached a tentative agreement for a five-year contract with our flight attendants. The tentative agreement was subject to ratification by the flight attendant membership. On October 1, 2014, we were notified that the flight attendants voted not to ratify the tentative agreement. We will continue to work together with the AFA-CWA and the NMB with a goal of reaching a mutually beneficial agreement. In July 2014, approximately 250 ramp service agents directly employed by the Company voted to be represented by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM). As of December 31, 2014, these ramp service agents served 4 of the 56 airports where we operate. We have begun the process of negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with the IAM. If we are unable to reach agreement with any of our unionized work groups in current or future negotiations regarding the terms of their collective bargaining agreements, we may be subject to work interruptions or stoppages. Any such action or other labor dispute with unionized employees could disrupt our operations, reduce our profitability, or interfere with the ability of our management to focus on executing our business strategies.
We have a significant amount of aircraft-related fixed obligations that could impair our liquidity and thereby harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The airline business is capital intensive and, as a result, many airline companies are highly leveraged. As of December 31, 2014 , our 65 aircraft fleet consisted of 61 aircraft financed under operating leases and 4 aircraft financed under debt arrangements. In 2014 and 2013 , we paid the lessors rent of $198.7 million and $166.3 million , respectively, and maintenance deposits net of reimbursements of $31.9 million and $24.1 million , respectively. As of December 31, 2014 , we had future operating lease obligations of approximately $1.7 billion . In 2014 and 2013, we had no payments related to debt arrangements as we entered into these arrangements in late 2014 and repayment commences in 2015. As of December 31, 2014 , we had future principal debt obligations of approximately $148.0 million , of which $10.4 million is due in 2015 . In addition, we have significant obligations for aircraft and spare engines that we have ordered from Airbus, International Aero Engines AG, or IAE, and Pratt and Whitney for delivery over the next several years. Our ability to pay the fixed costs associated with our contractual obligations will depend on our operating performance, cash flow and our ability to secure adequate financing, which will in turn depend on, among other things, the success of our current business strategy, fuel price

16



volatility, further weakening or improving in the U.S. economy, as well as general economic and political conditions and other factors that are, to some extent, beyond our control. The amount of our aircraft related fixed obligations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and could:
require a substantial portion of cash flow from operations for operating lease and maintenance deposit payments, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate purposes;
limit our ability to make required pre-delivery deposit payments, or PDPs, including those payable to our aircraft and engine manufacturers for our aircraft and spare engines on order;
limit our ability to obtain additional financing to support our expansion plans and for working capital and other purposes on acceptable terms or at all;
make it more difficult for us to pay our other obligations as they become due during adverse general economic and market industry conditions because any related decrease in revenues could cause us to not have sufficient cash flows from operations to make our scheduled payments;
reduce our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the airline industry and, consequently, place us at a competitive disadvantage to our competitors with less fixed payment obligations; and
cause us to lose access to one or more aircraft and forfeit our rent deposits if we are unable to make our required aircraft lease rental payments and our lessors exercise their remedies under the lease agreement including cross default provisions in certain of our leases.
A failure to pay our operating lease, debt and other fixed cost obligations or a breach of our contractual obligations could result in a variety of adverse consequences, including the exercise of remedies by our creditors and lessors. In such a situation, it is unlikely that we would be able to cure our breach, fulfill our obligations, make required lease payments or otherwise cover our fixed costs, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We are highly dependent upon our cash balances and operating cash flows.
As of December 31, 2014 , we had access to lines of credit from four counterparties to our jet fuel derivatives and our purchase credit card issuer aggregating to $56.6 million . These credit facilities are not adequate to finance our operations, and we will continue to be dependent on our operating cash flows and cash balances to fund our operations and to make scheduled payments on our aircraft related fixed obligations. Although our credit card processors currently do not have a right to hold back credit card receipts to cover repayment to customers, if we fail to maintain certain liquidity and other financial covenants, their rights to holdback would be reinstated, which would result in a reduction of unrestricted cash that could be material. In addition, we are required by some of our aircraft lessors to fund reserves in cash in advance for scheduled maintenance, and a portion of our cash is therefore unavailable until after we have completed the scheduled maintenance in accordance with the terms of the operating leases. Based on the age of our fleet and our growth strategy, these maintenance deposits will increase over the next few years before we receive any significant reimbursement for completed maintenance. If we fail to generate sufficient funds from operations to meet our operating cash requirements or do not obtain a line of credit, other borrowing facility or equity financing, we could default on our operating lease and fixed obligations. Our inability to meet our obligations as they become due would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
A deterioration in worldwide economic conditions may adversely affect our business, operating results, financial condition, liquidity and ability to obtain financing or access capital markets.
The general worldwide economy has in the past experienced downturns due to the effects of the European debt crisis, unfavorable U.S. economic conditions and slowing growth in certain Asian economies, including general credit market crises, collateral effects on the finance and banking industries, concerns about inflation, slower economic activity, decreased consumer confidence, reduced corporate profits and capital spending, adverse business conditions and liquidity concerns. The airline industry is particularly sensitive to changes in economic conditions, which affect customer travel patterns and related revenues.  A weak economy could reduce our bookings, and a reduction in discretionary spending could also decrease amounts our customers are willing to pay.  Unfavorable economic conditions can also impact the ability of airlines to raise fares to help offset increased fuel, labor and other costs. We cannot accurately predict the effect or duration of any economic slowdown or the timing or strength of a subsequent economic recovery.
In addition, we have significant obligations for aircraft and spare engines that we have ordered from Airbus, IAE and Pratt and Whitney over the next several years, and we will need to finance these purchases. We may not have sufficient liquidity or creditworthiness to fund the purchase of aircraft and engines, including payment of PDPs, or for other working

17



capital. Factors that affect our ability to raise financing or access the capital markets include market conditions in the airline industry, economic conditions, the perceived residual value of aircraft and related assets, the level and volatility of our earnings, our relative competitive position in the markets in which we operate, our ability to retain key personnel, our operating cash flows and legal and regulatory developments. Regardless of our creditworthiness, at times the market for aircraft purchase or lease financing has been very constrained due to such factors as the general state of the capital markets and the financial position of the major providers of commercial aircraft financing.
Our liquidity and general level of capital resources impact our ability to hedge our fuel requirements.
We enter into fuel derivative contracts in order to mitigate the risk to our business from future volatility in fuel prices, refining risk between the price of crude oil and the price of refined jet fuel, and to manage the risk of increasing fuel prices. As of December 31, 2014 , we had jet fuel option agreements in place to protect approximately 35% of our 2015 anticipated fuel consumption. There can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into fuel derivative contracts in the future. In the past, we have not had and in the future we may not have sufficient creditworthiness or liquidity to post the collateral necessary to hedge our fuel requirements. Even if we are able to hedge portions of our future fuel requirements, we cannot guarantee that our derivative contracts will provide any particular level of protection against increased fuel costs or that our counterparties will be able to perform under our derivative contracts, such as in the case of a counterparty’s insolvency. In a falling fuel environment, we may be forced to make cash payments to the counterparties which may impair our liquidity position and increase our costs. Furthermore, our ability to react to the cost of fuel, absent hedging, is limited, because we set the price of tickets in advance of knowing our fuel costs at the time the tickets are flown. Our ability to pass on any significant increases in aircraft fuel costs through fare increases could also be limited.
We rely on maintaining a high daily aircraft utilization rate to implement our low cost structure, which makes us especially vulnerable to flight delays or cancellations or aircraft unavailability.
We maintain a high daily aircraft utilization rate. Our average daily aircraft utilization was 12.7 hours, 12.7 hours and 12.8 hours for 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively. Aircraft utilization is the average amount of time per day that our aircraft spend carrying passengers. Our revenue per aircraft can be increased by high daily aircraft utilization, which is achieved in part by reducing turnaround times at airports so we can fly more hours on average in a day. Aircraft utilization is reduced by delays and cancellations from various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including air traffic congestion at airports or other air traffic control problems, adverse weather conditions, increased security measures or breaches in security, international or domestic conflicts, terrorist activity, or other changes in business conditions. A significant portion of our operations are concentrated in markets such as South Florida, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Northeast and northern Midwest regions of the United States, which are particularly vulnerable to weather, airport traffic constraints and other delays. In addition, pulling aircraft out of service for unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, the occurrence of which will increase as our fleet ages, may materially reduce our average fleet utilization and require that we seek short-term substitute capacity at increased costs. Due to the relatively small size of our fleet and high daily aircraft utilization rate, the unavailability of one or more aircraft and resulting reduced capacity could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Our maintenance costs will increase as our fleet ages, and we will periodically incur substantial maintenance costs due to the maintenance schedules of our aircraft fleet.
As of December 31, 2014 , the average age of our aircraft was approximately 5.1 years. Our relatively new aircraft require less maintenance now than they will in the future. Our fleet will require more maintenance as it ages and our maintenance and repair expenses for each of our aircraft will be incurred at approximately the same intervals. We expect that the final heavy maintenance events will be amortized over the remaining lease term rather than until the next estimated heavy maintenance event, because we account for heavy maintenance under the deferral method. This will result in significantly higher depreciation and amortization expense related to heavy maintenance in the last few years of the leases as compared to the costs in earlier periods. Moreover, because our current fleet was acquired over a relatively short period, significant maintenance that is scheduled on each of these planes is occurring at roughly the same time, meaning we will incur our most expensive scheduled maintenance obligations, known as heavy maintenance, across our present fleet around the same time. These more significant maintenance activities result in out-of-service periods during which our aircraft are dedicated to maintenance activities and unavailable to fly revenue service. In addition, the terms of some of our lease agreements require us to pay supplemental rent, also known as maintenance reserves, to the lessor in advance of the performance of major maintenance, resulting in our recording significant prepaid deposits on our balance sheet. We expect scheduled and unscheduled aircraft maintenance expenses to increase as a percentage of our revenue over the next several years. Any significant increase in maintenance and repair expenses would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical

18



Accounting Policies and Estimates—Aircraft Maintenance, Materials and Repair Costs and Heavy Maintenance Amortization” and “—Maintenance Reserves.”
Our lack of marketing alliances could harm our business.
Many airlines, including the domestic traditional network airlines (American, Delta and United) have marketing alliances with other airlines, under which they market and advertise their status as marketing alliance partners. These alliances, such as OneWorld, SkyTeam and Star Alliance, generally provide for code-sharing, frequent flier program reciprocity, coordinated scheduling of flights to permit convenient connections and other joint marketing activities. Such arrangements permit an airline to market flights operated by other alliance members as its own. This increases the destinations, connections and frequencies offered by the airline and provides an opportunity to increase traffic on that airline’s segment of flights connecting with alliance partners. We currently do not have any alliances with U.S. or foreign airlines. Our lack of marketing alliances puts us at a competitive disadvantage to traditional network carriers who are able to attract passengers through more widespread alliances, particularly on international routes, and that disadvantage may result in a material adverse effect on our passenger traffic, business, results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to extensive and increasing regulation by the FAA, DOT, TSA and other U.S. and foreign governmental agencies, compliance with which could cause us to incur increased costs and adversely affect our business and financial results.

Airlines are subject to extensive and increasing regulatory and legal compliance requirements, both domestically and internationally, that involve significant costs. In the last several years, Congress has passed laws, and the DOT, FAA and TSA have issued regulations, relating to the operation of airlines that have required significant expenditures. We expect to continue to incur expenses in connection with complying with government regulations. Additional laws, regulations, taxes and increased airport rates and charges have been proposed from time to time that could significantly increase the cost of airline operations or reduce the demand for air travel. If adopted, these measures could have the effect of raising ticket prices, reducing revenue and increasing costs. For example, the DOT finalized rules in April 2010 requiring new procedures for customer handling during long onboard tarmac delays, as well as additional reporting requirements for airlines that could increase the cost of airline operations or reduce revenues. The DOT has been aggressively investigating alleged violations of these rules. A second set of DOT final rules, which became effective in August 2011 and January 2012, addresses, among other things, concerns about how airlines handle interactions with passengers through advertising, the reservations process, at the airport and on board the aircraft, including requirements for disclosure of base fares plus a set of regulatorily dictated options and limits on cancellations and service charges for changes and cancellations. Additional consumer passenger rules were proposed in 2014 which may be implemented in 2015 and additional disability rules may be proposed in 2015. In addition, during 2014, the FAA issued its final regulations governing pilot rest periods and work hours for all airlines certificated under Part 121 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The rule known as FAR 117, which became effective January 4, 2014, impacts the required amount and timing of rest periods for pilots between work assignments and modifies duty and rest requirements based on the time of day, number of scheduled segments, flight types, time zones and other factors. Compliance with these rules may increase our costs, while failure to remain in full compliance with these rules may subject us to fines or other enforcement action.
We cannot assure you that compliance with these rules will not have a material adverse effect on our business.

In August 2010, the Airline Baggage Transparency and Accountability Act was introduced in the United States Senate. This legislation, as proposed, would have increase disclosure regarding fees for airline ticket sales, impose federal taxes on charges for carry-on and checked baggage, authorize the DOT's Aviation Consumer Protection Division to oversee lost and stolen baggage claims, and require data collection and the public release of collected data concerning airline handling of lost, damaged and stolen luggage. In early 2011, the United States Senate passed an amendment to the FAA reauthorization bill that, if enacted, would have imposed federal taxes at a rate of 7.5% on charges for carry-on baggage. If the Airline Baggage Transparency and Accountability Act, the Senate amendment to the FAA reauthorization bill or similar legislation were to be enacted, it is uncertain what effect it would have on our results of operations and financial condition.

We cannot assure you that these and other laws or regulations enacted in the future will not harm our business. In addition, the TSA mandates the federalization of certain airport security procedures and imposes additional security requirements on airports and airlines, most of which are funded by a per ticket tax on passengers and a tax on airlines. In July 2014, the TSA implemented an increased passenger security fee at a flat rate of $5.60. On December 19, 2014, a new law took effect which limits a round-trip fee to $11.20. We cannot forecast what additional security and safety requirements may be imposed in the future or the costs or revenue impact that would be associated with complying with such requirements.

Our ability to operate as an airline is dependent on our maintaining certifications issued to us by the DOT and the FAA. The FAA has the authority to issue mandatory orders relating to, among other things, the grounding of aircraft, inspection

19



of aircraft, installation of new safety-related items and removal and replacement of aircraft parts that have failed or may fail in the future. A decision by the FAA to ground, or require time consuming inspections of or maintenance on, our aircraft, for any reason, could negatively affect our business and financial results. Federal law requires that air carriers operating large aircraft be continuously “fit, willing and able” to provide the services for which they are licensed. Our “fitness” is monitored by the DOT, which considers factors such as unfair or deceptive competition, advertising, baggage liability and disabled passenger transportation. While the DOT has seldom revoked a carrier's certification for lack of fitness, such an occurrence would render it impossible for us to continue operating as an airline. The DOT may also institute investigations or administrative proceedings against airlines for violations of regulations.

International routes are regulated by treaties and related agreements between the United States and foreign governments. Our ability to operate international routes is subject to change because the applicable arrangements between the United States and foreign governments may be amended from time to time. Our access to new international markets may be limited by our ability to obtain the necessary certificates to fly the international routes. In addition, our operations in foreign countries are subject to regulation by foreign governments and our business may be affected by changes in law and future actions taken by such governments, including granting or withdrawal of government approvals and restrictions on competitive practices. We are subject to numerous foreign regulations based on the large number of countries outside the United States where we currently provide service. If we are not able to comply with this complex regulatory regime, our business could be significantly harmed. Please see “Business — Government Regulation.”

We may not be able to implement our growth strategy.
Our growth strategy includes acquiring additional aircraft, increasing the frequency of flights and size of aircraft used in markets we currently serve, and expanding the number of markets we serve where our low cost structure would likely be successful. Effectively implementing our growth strategy is critical for our business to achieve economies of scale and to sustain or increase our profitability. We face numerous challenges in implementing our growth strategy, including our ability to:
maintain profitability;
obtain financing to acquire new aircraft;
access airports located in our targeted geographic markets where we can operate routes in a manner that is consistent with our cost strategy;
gain access to international routes; and
access sufficient gates and other services at airports we currently serve or may seek to serve.
Our growth is dependent upon our ability to maintain a safe and secure operation and requires additional personnel, equipment and facilities. An inability to hire and retain personnel, timely secure the required equipment and facilities in a cost-effective manner, efficiently operate our expanded facilities or obtain the necessary regulatory approvals may adversely affect our ability to achieve our growth strategy, which could harm our business. In addition, expansion to new markets may have other risks due to factors specific to those markets. We may be unable to foresee all of the existing risks upon entering certain new markets or respond adequately to these risks, and our growth strategy and our business may suffer as a result. In addition, our competitors may reduce their fares and/or offer special promotions following our entry into a new market. We cannot assure you that we will be able to profitably expand our existing markets or establish new markets.
Some of our target growth markets in the Caribbean and Latin America include countries with less developed economies that may be vulnerable to unstable economic and political conditions, such as significant fluctuations in gross domestic product, interest and currency exchange rates, civil disturbances, government instability, nationalization and expropriation of private assets and the imposition of taxes or other charges by governments. The occurrence of any of these events in markets served by us and the resulting instability may adversely affect our ability to implement our growth strategy.
In 2008, in response to record high fuel prices and rapidly deteriorating economic conditions, we modified our growth plans by terminating our leases for seven aircraft. We incurred significant expenses relating to our lease terminations, and have incurred additional expenses to acquire new aircraft in place of those under the terminated leases as we expanded our network. We may in the future determine to reduce further our future growth plans from previously announced levels, which may impact our business strategy and future profitability.



20



We rely heavily on technology and automated systems to operate our business and any failure of these technologies or systems or failure by their operators could harm our business.
We are highly dependent on technology and automated systems to operate our business and achieve low operating costs. These technologies and systems include our computerized airline reservation system, flight operations system, financial planning, management and accounting system, telecommunications systems, website, maintenance systems and check-in kiosks. In order for our operations to work efficiently, our website and reservation system must be able to accommodate a high volume of traffic, maintain secure information and deliver flight information. Substantially all of our tickets are issued to passengers as electronic tickets. We depend on our reservation system, which is hosted and maintained under a long-term contract by a third-party service provider, to be able to issue, track and accept these electronic tickets. If our reservation system fails or experiences interruptions, and we are unable to book seats for any period of time, we could lose a significant amount of revenue as customers book seats on competing airlines. We have experienced short duration reservation system outages from time to time and may experience similar outages in the future. For example, in November 2010, we experienced a significant service outage with our third-party reservation service provider on the day before Thanksgiving, one of the industry’s busiest travel days and in August 2013, we experienced another 13 hour outage that affected our sales and customer service response times. We also rely on third-party service providers of our other automated systems for technical support, system maintenance and software upgrades. If our automated systems are not functioning or if the current providers were to fail to adequately provide technical support or timely software upgrades for any one of our key existing systems, we could experience service disruptions, which could harm our business and result in the loss of important data, increase our expenses and decrease our revenues. In the event that one or more of our primary technology or systems’ vendors goes into bankruptcy, ceases operations or fails to perform as promised, replacement services may not be readily available on a timely basis, at competitive rates or at all and any transition time to a new system may be significant.
In addition, our automated systems cannot be completely protected against events that are beyond our control, including natural disasters, computer viruses or telecommunications failures. Substantial or sustained system failures could cause service delays or failures and result in our customers purchasing tickets from other airlines. We have implemented security measures and change control procedures and have disaster recovery plans; however, we cannot assure you that these measures are adequate to prevent disruptions. Disruption in, changes to or a breach of, these systems could result in a disruption to our business and the loss of important data. Any of the foregoing could result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to cyber security risks and may incur increasing costs in an effort to minimize those risks.
Our business employs systems and websites that allow for the secure storage and transmission of proprietary or confidential information regarding our customers, employees, suppliers and others, including personal identification information, credit card data and other confidential information. Security breaches could expose us to a risk of loss or misuse of this information, litigation and potential liability. Although we take steps to secure our management information systems, and although multiple auditors review and approve the security configurations and management processes of these systems, including our computer systems, intranet and internet sites, email and other telecommunications and data networks, the security measures we have implemented may not be effective, and our systems may be vulnerable to theft, loss, damage and interruption from a number of potential sources and events, including unauthorized access or security breaches, natural or man-made disasters, cyber attacks, computer viruses, power loss, or other disruptive events.  We may not have the resources or technical sophistication to anticipate or prevent rapidly evolving types of cyber attacks. Attacks may be targeted at us, our customers and suppliers, or others who have entrusted us with information. In addition, attacks not targeted at us, but targeted solely at suppliers, may cause disruption to our computer systems or a breach of the data that we maintain on customers, employees, suppliers and others.
Actual or anticipated attacks may cause us to incur increasing costs, including costs to deploy additional personnel and protection technologies, train employees and engage third-party experts and consultants, or costs incurred in connection with the notifications to employees, suppliers or the general public as part of our notification obligations to the various governments that govern our business. Advances in computer capabilities, new technological discoveries, or other developments may result in the breach or compromise of technology used by us to protect transaction or other data. In addition, data and security breaches can also occur as a result of non-technical issues, including breaches by us or by persons with whom we have commercial relationships that result in the unauthorized release of personal or confidential information. Our reputation, brand and financial condition could be adversely affected if, as a result of a significant cyber event or other security issues: our operations are disrupted or shut down; our confidential, proprietary information is stolen or disclosed; we incur costs or are required to pay fines in connection with stolen customer, employee or other confidential information; we must dedicate significant resources to system repairs or increase cyber security protection; or we otherwise incur significant litigation or other costs.

21



Our processing, storage, use and disclosure of personal data could give rise to liabilities as a result of governmental regulation.
In the processing of our customer transactions, we receive, process, transmit and store a large volume of identifiable personal data, including financial data such as credit card information. This data is increasingly subject to legislation and regulation, typically intended to protect the privacy of personal data that is collected, processed and transmitted. More generally, we rely on consumer confidence in the security of our system, including our website on which we sell the majority of our tickets. Our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected if we are unable to comply with existing privacy obligations or legislation or regulations are expanded to require changes in our business practices.
We may not be able to maintain or grow our non-ticket revenues.
Our business strategy includes expanding our portfolio of ancillary products and services. There can be no assurance that passengers will pay for additional ancillary products and services or that passengers will continue to choose to pay for the ancillary products and services we currently offer. Further, regulatory initiatives could adversely affect ancillary revenue opportunities. Failure to maintain our non-ticket revenues would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, if we are unable to maintain and grow our non-ticket revenues, we may not be able to execute our strategy to continue to lower base fares in order to stimulate demand for air travel. Please see “—Restrictions on or increased taxes applicable to charges for ancillary products and services paid by airline passengers and burdensome consumer protection regulations or laws could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.”
Our inability to expand or operate reliably or efficiently out of our key airports where we maintain a large presence could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We are highly dependent on markets served from airports where we maintain a large presence. Our results of operations may be affected by actions taken by governmental or other agencies or authorities having jurisdiction over our operations at airports, including, but not limited to:
increases in airport rates and charges;
limitations on take-off and landing slots, airport gate capacity or other use of airport facilities;
termination of our airport use agreements, some of which can be terminated by airport authorities with little notice to us;
increases in airport capacity that could facilitate increased competition;
international travel regulations such as customs and immigration;
increases in taxes;
changes in the law that affect the services that can be offered by airlines in particular markets and at particular airports;
restrictions on competitive practices;
the adoption of statutes or regulations that impact customer service standards, including security standards; and
the adoption of more restrictive locally-imposed noise regulations or curfews.
In general, any changes in airport operations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We rely on third-party service providers to perform functions integral to our operations.
We have entered into agreements with third-party service providers to furnish certain facilities and services required for our operations, including ground handling, catering, passenger handling, engineering, maintenance, refueling, reservations and airport facilities as well as administrative and support services. We are likely to enter into similar service agreements in new markets we decide to enter, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain the necessary services at acceptable rates.
Although we seek to monitor the performance of third parties that provide us with our reservation system, ground handling, catering, passenger handling, engineering, maintenance services, refueling and airport facilities, the efficiency,

22



timeliness and quality of contract performance by third-party service providers are often beyond our control, and any failure by our service providers to perform their contracts may have an adverse impact on our business and operations. For example, in 2008, our call center provider went bankrupt. Though we were able to quickly switch to an alternative vendor, we experienced a significant business disruption during the transition period and a similar disruption could occur in the future if we changed call center providers or if an existing provider ceased to be able to serve us. We expect to be dependent on such third-party arrangements for the foreseeable future.
We rely on third-party distribution channels to distribute a portion of our airline tickets .
We rely on third-party distribution channels, including those provided by or through global distribution systems, or GDSs, conventional travel agents and online travel agents, or OTAs, to distribute a portion of our airline tickets, and we expect in the future to rely on these channels to an increasing extent to collect ancillary revenues. These distribution channels are more expensive and at present have less functionality in respect of ancillary revenues than those we operate ourselves, such as our call centers and our website. Certain of these distribution channels also effectively restrict the manner in which we distribute our products generally. To remain competitive, we will need to successfully manage our distribution costs and rights, and improve the functionality of third-party distribution channels, while maintaining an industry-competitive cost structure. Negotiations with key GDSs and OTAs designed to manage our costs, increase our distribution flexibility, and improve functionality could be contentious, could result in diminished or less favorable distribution of our tickets, and may not provide the functionality we require to maximize ancillary revenues. Any inability to manage our third-party distribution costs, rights and functionality at a competitive level or any material diminishment in the distribution of our tickets could have a material adverse effect on our competitive position and our results of operations. Moreover, our ability to compete in the markets we serve may be threatened by changes in technology or other factors that may make our existing third-party sales channels impractical, uncompetitive, or obsolete.
We rely on a single service provider to manage our fuel supply.
As of December 31, 2014 , we had a single fuel service contract with World Fuel Services Corporation to manage the sourcing and contracting of our fuel supply. A failure by this provider to fulfill its obligations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Our reputation and business could be adversely affected in the event of an emergency, accident or similar incident involving our aircraft.
We are exposed to potential significant losses in the event that any of our aircraft is subject to an emergency, accident, terrorist incident or other similar incident, and significant costs related to passenger claims, repairs or replacement of a damaged aircraft and its temporary or permanent loss from service. There can be no assurance that we will not be affected by such events or that the amount of our insurance coverage will be adequate in the event such circumstances arise and any such event could cause a substantial increase in our insurance premiums. Please see “—Increases in insurance costs or significant reductions in coverage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.” In addition, any future aircraft emergency, accident or similar incident, even if fully covered by insurance or even if it does not involve our airline, may create a public perception that our airline or the equipment we fly is less safe or reliable than other transportation alternatives, or could cause us to perform time consuming and costly inspections on our aircraft or engines which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Negative publicity regarding our customer service could have a material adverse effect on our business.
In the past, we have experienced a relatively high number of customer complaints related to, among other things, our customer service and reservations and ticketing systems. In particular, we generally experience a higher volume of complaints when we make changes to our unbundling policies, such as charging for baggage. In addition, in 2009, we entered into a consent order with the DOT for our procedures for bumping passengers from oversold flights and our handling of lost or damaged baggage. Under the consent order, we were assessed a civil penalty of $375,000, of which we were required to pay $215,000 based on an agreement with the DOT and our not having similar violations in the year after the date of the consent order. If we do not meet our customers' expectations with respect to reliability and service, customers could decide not to fly with us, which would adversely affect our business and reputation.
We depend on a limited number of suppliers for our aircraft and engines.
One of the elements of our business strategy is to save costs by operating a single-family aircraft fleet - currently Airbus A320-family, single-aisle aircraft, powered by engines manufactured by IAE. If Airbus, IAE, or Pratt and Whitney become unable to perform its contractual obligations, or if we are unable to acquire or lease aircraft or engines from other owners, operators or lessors on acceptable terms, we would have to find other suppliers for a similar type of aircraft or engine. If we

23



have to lease or purchase aircraft from another supplier, we would lose the significant benefits we derive from our current single fleet composition. We may also incur substantial transition costs, including costs associated with retraining our employees, replacing our manuals and adapting our facilities and maintenance programs. Our operations could also be harmed by the failure or inability of aircraft, engine and parts suppliers to provide sufficient spare parts or related support services on a timely basis. Our business would be significantly harmed if a design defect or mechanical problem with any of the types of aircraft or components that we operate were discovered that would ground any of our aircraft while the defect or problem was corrected, assuming it could be corrected at all. The use of our aircraft could be suspended or restricted by regulatory authorities in the event of any actual or perceived mechanical or design problems. Our business would also be significantly harmed if the public began to avoid flying with us due to an adverse perception of the types of aircraft that we operate stemming from safety concerns or other problems, whether real or perceived, or in the event of an accident involving those types of aircraft or components. Carriers that operate a more diversified fleet are better positioned than we are to manage such events.
Reduction in demand for air transportation, or governmental reduction or limitation of operating capacity, in the domestic U.S., Caribbean or Latin American markets could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
A significant portion of our operations are conducted to and from the domestic U.S., Caribbean or Latin American markets. Our business, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed if we lost our authority to fly to these markets, by any circumstances causing a reduction in demand for air transportation, or by governmental reduction or limitation of operating capacity, in these markets, such as adverse changes in local economic or political conditions, negative public perception of these destinations, unfavorable weather conditions, or terrorist related activities. Furthermore, our business could be harmed if jurisdictions that currently limit competition allow additional airlines to compete on routes we serve. Many of the countries we serve are experiencing either economic slowdowns or recessions, which may translate into a weakening of demand and could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Increases in insurance costs or significant reductions in coverage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We carry insurance for public liability, passenger liability, property damage and all-risk coverage for damage to our aircraft. As a result of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, aviation insurers significantly reduced the amount of insurance coverage available to commercial air carriers for liability to persons other than employees or passengers for claims resulting from acts of terrorism, war or similar events (war risk insurance). Accordingly, our insurance costs increased significantly and our ability to continue to obtain certain types of insurance remains uncertain. While the price of commercial insurance has declined since the period immediately after the terrorist attacks, in the event commercial insurance carriers further reduce the amount of insurance coverage available to us, or significantly increase its cost, we would be adversely affected. We currently maintain commercial airline insurance with several underwriters. However, there can be no assurance that the amount of such coverage will not be changed, or that we will not bear substantial losses from accidents. We could incur substantial claims resulting from an accident in excess of related insurance coverage that could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
As of July 2014, we obtained third-party war risk insurance, which insures against some risks of terrorism, from the commercial market. Previous to this date, we obtained this insurance through a special program administered by the FAA, which was discontinued late 2014. Renewing coverage from commercial underwriters may result in higher premiums and more restrictive terms. Our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected if we are unable to obtain adequate war risk insurance. Our current war risk hull and liability insurance policy is effective until July 2015 .
Failure to comply with applicable environmental regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to increasingly stringent federal, state, local and foreign laws, regulations and ordinances relating to the protection of the environment, including those relating to emissions to the air, discharges to surface and subsurface waters, safe drinking water and the management of hazardous substances, oils and waste materials. Compliance with all environmental laws and regulations can require significant expenditures and any future regulatory developments in the United States and abroad could adversely affect operations and increase operating costs in the airline industry. For example, climate change legislation was previously introduced in Congress and such legislation could be re-introduced in the future by Congress and state legislatures, and could contain provisions affecting the aviation industry, compliance with which could result in the creation of substantial additional costs to us. Similarly, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a rule that regulates larger emitters of greenhouse gases. Future operations and financial results may vary as a result of such regulations. Compliance with these

24



regulations and new or existing regulations that may be applicable to us in the future could increase our cost base and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Governmental authorities in several U.S. and foreign cities are also considering or have already implemented aircraft noise reduction programs, including the imposition of nighttime curfews and limitations on daytime take-offs and landings. We have been able to accommodate local noise restrictions imposed to date, but our operations could be adversely affected if locally-imposed regulations become more restrictive or widespread.
If we are unable to attract and retain qualified personnel or fail to maintain our company culture, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.
Our business is labor intensive. We require large numbers of pilots, flight attendants, maintenance technicians and other personnel. The airline industry has from time to time experienced a shortage of qualified personnel, particularly with respect to pilots and maintenance technicians. In addition, as is common with most of our competitors, we have faced considerable turnover of our employees. We may be required to increase wages and/or benefits in order to attract and retain qualified personnel. If we are unable to hire, train and retain qualified employees, our business could be harmed and we may be unable to implement our growth plans.
In addition, as we hire more people and grow, we believe it may be increasingly challenging to continue to hire people who will maintain our company culture. Our company culture, which we believe is one of our competitive strengths, is important to providing high-quality customer service and having a productive, accountable workforce that helps keep our costs low. As we continue to grow, we may be unable to identify, hire or retain enough people who meet the above criteria, including those in management or other key positions. Our company culture could otherwise be adversely affected by our growing operations and geographic diversity. If we fail to maintain the strength of our company culture, our competitive ability and our business, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.
Our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected if we lose the services of our key personnel.
Our success depends to a significant extent upon the efforts and abilities of our senior management team and key financial and operating personnel. In particular, we depend on the services of our senior management team, including Ben Baldanza, our President and Chief Executive Officer. Competition for highly qualified personnel is intense, and the loss of any executive officer, senior manager, or other key employee without adequate replacement or the inability to attract new qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. We do not maintain key-man life insurance on our management team.
The requirements of being a public company may strain our resources, divert management’s attention and affect our ability to attract and retain qualified board members.
As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company, including costs associated with public company reporting requirements. We also have incurred and will incur costs associated with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and related rules implemented or to be implemented by the SEC and the NASDAQ Stock Market. The expenses incurred by public companies generally for reporting and corporate governance purposes have been increasing. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some activities more time-consuming and costly. These laws and regulations could also make it more difficult or costly for us to obtain certain types of insurance, including director and officer liability insurance, and we may be forced to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. These laws and regulations could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our board of directors, our board committees, or as our executive officers and may divert management’s attention. Furthermore, if we are unable to satisfy our obligations as a public company, we could be subject to delisting of our common stock, fines, sanctions and other regulatory action and potentially civil litigation.
We are required to assess our internal control over financial reporting on an annual basis, and any future adverse findings from such assessment could result in a loss of investor confidence in our financial reports, significant expenses to remediate any internal control deficiencies, and ultimately have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock.
Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended, our management is required to report on, and our independent registered public accounting firm to attest to, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. The rules governing the standards that must be met for management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are

25



complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. Annually, we perform activities that include reviewing, documenting and testing our internal control over financial reporting. During the performance of these activities, we may encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any changes necessary to make a favorable assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. In connection with the attestation process by our independent registered public accounting firm, we may encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any requested improvements and receiving a favorable attestation. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting we will not be able to conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404. If we fail to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment, we could suffer material misstatements in our financial statements and fail to meet our reporting obligations, which would likely cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. This could harm our operating results and lead to a decline in our stock price. Additionally, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could expose us to increased risk of fraud or misuse of corporate assets and subject us to potential delisting from the NASDAQ Global Select Market, regulatory investigations, civil or criminal sanctions and class action litigation.
The market price of our common stock may be volatile, which could cause the value of an investment in our stock to decline.
The market price of our common stock may fluctuate substantially due to a variety of factors, many of which are beyond our control, including:
announcements concerning our competitors, the airline industry or the economy in general;
strategic actions by us or our competitors, such as acquisitions or restructurings;
media reports and publications about the safety of our aircraft or the aircraft type we operate;
new regulatory pronouncements and changes in regulatory guidelines;
changes in the price of aircraft fuel;
announcements concerning the availability of the type of aircraft we use;
general and industry-specific economic conditions;
changes in financial estimates or recommendations by securities analysts or failure to meet analysts’ performance expectations;
sales of our common stock or other actions by investors with significant shareholdings;
trading strategies related to changes in fuel or oil prices; and
general market, political and economic conditions.
The stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These types of broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.
In the past, stockholders have sometimes instituted securities class action litigation against companies following periods of volatility in the market price of their securities. Any similar litigation against us could result in substantial costs, divert management’s attention and resources and harm our business or results of operations.
If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or publish negative reports about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.
The trading market for our common stock depends in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our stock could decrease, which might cause our stock price and trading volume to decline.

26



Our anti-takeover provisions may delay or prevent a change of control, which could adversely affect the price of our common stock.
Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws contain provisions that may make it difficult to remove our board of directors and management and may discourage or delay “change of control” transactions, which could adversely affect the price of our common stock. These provisions include, among others:
our board of directors is divided into three classes, with each class serving for a staggered three-year term, which prevents stockholders from electing an entirely new board of directors at an annual meeting;
actions to be taken by our stockholders may only be effected at an annual or special meeting of our stockholders and not by written consent;
special meetings of our stockholders can be called only by the Chairman of the Board or by our corporate secretary at the direction of our board of directors;
advance notice procedures that stockholders must comply with in order to nominate candidates to our board of directors and propose matters to be brought before an annual meeting of our stockholders may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from conducting a solicitation of proxies to elect the acquirer’s own slate of directors or otherwise attempting to obtain control of our company; and
our board of directors may, without stockholder approval, issue series of preferred stock, or rights to acquire preferred stock, that could dilute the interest of, or impair the voting power of, holders of our common stock or could also be used as a method of discouraging, delaying or preventing a change of control.
Our corporate charter and bylaws include provisions limiting voting by non-U.S. citizens and specifying an exclusive forum for stockholder disputes.
To comply with restrictions imposed by federal law on foreign ownership of U.S. airlines, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws restrict voting of shares of our common stock by non-U.S. citizens. The restrictions imposed by federal law currently require that no more than 25% of our stock be voted, directly or indirectly, by persons who are not U.S. citizens, and that our president and at least two-thirds of the members of our board of directors and senior management be U.S. citizens. Our amended and restated bylaws provide that the failure of non-U.S. citizens to register their shares on a separate stock record, which we refer to as the “foreign stock record,” would result in a suspension of their voting rights in the event that the aggregate foreign ownership of the outstanding common stock exceeds the foreign ownership restrictions imposed by federal law.
Our amended and restated bylaws further provide that no shares of our common stock will be registered on the foreign stock record if the amount so registered would exceed the foreign ownership restrictions imposed by federal law. If it is determined that the amount registered in the foreign stock record exceeds the foreign ownership restrictions imposed by federal law, shares will be removed from the foreign stock record in reverse chronological order based on the date of registration therein, until the number of shares registered therein does not exceed the foreign ownership restrictions imposed by federal law. As of December 31, 2014 , we believe we were in compliance with the foreign ownership rules.
As of December 31, 2014 , there are no shares of non-voting common stock outstanding. When shares of non-voting common stock are outstanding, the holders of such stock may convert such shares, on a share-for-share basis, in the order reflected on our foreign stock record as shares of common stock are sold or otherwise transferred by non-U.S. citizens to U.S. citizens.
Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation also specifies that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware shall be the exclusive forum for substantially all disputes between us and our stockholders.
We do not intend to pay cash dividends for the foreseeable future.
We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock. We currently intend to retain our future earnings, if any, to finance the further development and expansion of our business and do not intend to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, restrictions contained in current or future financing instruments, business prospects and such other factors as our board of directors deems relevant.

27



ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES
Aircraft
As of December 31, 2014 , we operated a fleet of 65 aircraft as detailed in the following table:
Aircraft Type
Seats
Average Age (years)
Number of Aircraft
Number Owned
Number Leased
A319
145
8.5
29
29
A320
178
2.0
34
4
30
A321
218
9.4
2
2
 
 
5.1
65
4
61
As of December 31, 2014 , our aircraft orders, consisted of 101 A320 family aircraft with Airbus ( 21 of the existing A320 aircraft model, 40 A320neos, 30 of the existing A321 model and 10 A321neos) and 5 direct operating leases for A320neos with a third-party lessor. As of December 31, 2014 , our future fleet plan, net of contractual lease returns, is illustrated in the table below.
Aircraft Type
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
A319
29
26
22
17
16
9
5
A320
42
45
52
54
54
54
54
A320 NEO
1
5
5
11
14
27
45
A321
8
17
25
30
30
30
30
A321 NEO
10
10
10
Total Aircraft
80
93
104
112
124
130
144
Note: Actual fleet count may differ depending on future fleet decisions, including actual lease retirements.
We also have five spare engine orders for V2500 SelectOne engines with IAE and nine spare engine orders for PurePower PW 1100G-JM engines with Pratt & Whitney. Spare engines are scheduled for delivery from 2015 through 2024 .
Ground Facilities    
We lease all of our facilities at each of the airports we serve. Our leases for terminal passenger service facilities, which include ticket counter and gate space, operations support areas and baggage service offices, generally have a term ranging from month-to-month to 20 years, and contain provisions for periodic adjustments of lease rates. We also are responsible for maintenance, insurance and other facility-related expenses and services. We also have entered into use agreements at the airports we serve that provide for the non-exclusive use of runways, taxiways and other airfield facilities. Landing fees paid under these agreements are based on the number of landings and weight of the aircraft.
As of December 31, 2014 , Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) remained our single largest airport served, with over 15% of our capacity operating to or from FLL during 2014 . We operate primarily out of Terminal 4, the international terminal. We currently use up to nine gates at Terminal 4 and Terminal 3. We have preferential access to six of the Terminal 4 gates, preferential access to one of the Terminal 3 gates, common use access to the remaining two Terminal 4 gates, and access to other Terminal 3 gates. FLL is in the middle of a concourse replacement and expansion project, which would expand the number of gates at Terminal 4 from 10 to 14. Other airports through which we conduct significant operations include Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), McCarran International Airport (LAS) serving Las Vegas, Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport (DTW), LaGuardia Airport (LGA) serving New York City and Orlando International Airport (MCO).
Our largest maintenance facility is currently located in a leased facility at FLL under a lease that expires in January 2022. We also conduct additional maintenance operations in leased facilities in Detroit, Michigan; Chicago, Illinois; Atlantic City, New Jersey; Dallas, Texas; and Las Vegas, Nevada.

28



Our principal executive offices and headquarters are located in a leased facility at 2800 Executive Way, Miramar, Florida 33025, consisting of approximately 56,000 square feet. The lease for this facility expires in January 2025. In January 2014, we expanded our principal executive offices and headquarters by leasing an additional facility located at 2844 Corporate Way, Miramar, Florida 33025, consisting of approximately 15,000 square feet. The lease for this facility expires in January 2025. We also have a training center located in a leased facility at 1050 Lee Wagener Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315, consisting of approximately 12,000 square feet, under a lease that expires in January 2020.
ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are subject to commercial litigation claims and to administrative and regulatory proceedings and reviews that may be asserted or maintained from time to time. We believe the ultimate outcome of pending lawsuits, proceedings and reviews will not, individually or in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our financial position, liquidity, or results of operations.
ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

29



PART II
ITEM 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Market Price of our common stock
Our common stock is listed and traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol "SAVE." The following table shows, for the periods indicated, the high and low per share sales prices for our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market.
 
High
 
Low
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2013
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
26.87

 
$
17.40

Second Quarter
33.75

 
24.30

Third Quarter
36.83

 
29.65

Fourth Quarter
47.62

 
32.50

Fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
63.89

 
$
43.34

Second Quarter
64.94

 
53.25

Third Quarter
74.00

 
60.88

Fourth Quarter
85.35

 
52.75

As of February 6, 2015, there were approximately 31 holders of record of our common stock. Because many of our shares are held by brokers and other institutions on behalf of stockholders, we are unable to estimate the total number of stockholders represented by the beneficial holders.
The information under the caption “Equity Compensation Plan Information” in our 2015 Proxy Statement is incorporated herein by reference.
Dividend Policy
We have never declared or paid, and do not anticipate declaring or paying, any cash dividends on our common stock. Any future determination as to the declaration and payment of dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on then existing conditions, including our financial condition, operating results, contractual restrictions, capital requirements, business prospects and other factors our board of directors may deem relevant.

30



Our Repurchases of Equity Securities
The following table reflects our repurchases of our common stock during the fourth quarter of 2014 . All stock repurchases during this period were made from employees who received restricted stock grants. All stock repurchases were made at the election of each employee pursuant to an offer to repurchase by us. In each case, the shares repurchased constituted the portion of vested shares necessary to satisfy minimum withholding tax requirements.
ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Period
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased
 
Average Price Paid per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
 
Approximate Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet be Purchased Under Plans or Programs
October 1-31, 2014
 
1,107

 
$
63.20

 

 

November 1-30, 2014
 
771

 
$
76.04

 

 

December 1-31, 2014
 

 
N/A

 

 

Total
 
1,878

 
$
69.62

 

 

During the first three quarters of 2014 , we repurchased and retired 26,017 shares for a total of $1.5 million. All stock repurchases were made at the election of each employee pursuant to an offer to repurchase by us. In each case, the shares repurchased constituted the portion of vested shares necessary to satisfy withholding tax requirements. We did not make any open market stock repurchases during 2014 .
In December 2014, the Company's Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $100 million of the Company's common stock, par value of $0.0001 per share, from time to time in the open market or privately negotiated transactions over the twelve months ending December 16, 2015. The timing and amount of any stock repurchase is subject to prevailing market conditions and other considerations. As of December 31, 2014, we had made no repurchases under this program.

31



Stock Performance Graph
The following graph compares the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock with the cumulative total return on the NASDAQ Composite Index and the NYSE ARCA Airline Index for the period beginning on May 26, 2011 (the date our common stock was first traded) and ending on the last day of 2014 . The graph assumes an investment of $100 in our stock and the two indices, respectively, on May 26, 2011, and further assumes the reinvestment of all dividends. The May 26, 2011 stock price used for our stock is the initial public offering price. Stock price performance, presented for the period from May 26, 2011 to December 31, 2014 , is not necessarily indicative of future results.
 

 
 
5/26/2011
 
12/31/2011
 
12/31/2012
 
12/31/2013
 
12/31/2014
Spirit
 
$
100.00

 
$
130.00

 
$
147.75

 
$
378.42

 
$
629.83

NYSE ARCA Airline Index
 
$
100.00

 
$
75.49

 
$
103.90

 
$
164.39

 
$
246.68

NASDAQ Composite Index
 
$
100.00

 
$
94.23

 
$
110.91

 
$
155.15

 
$
177.99


32



ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
You should read the following selected historical financial and operating data below in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the financial statements, related notes and other financial information included in this annual report. The selected financial data in this section are not intended to replace the financial statements and are qualified in their entirety by the financial statements and related notes included in this annual report.
We derived the selected statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2014 , 2013 and 2012 and the balance sheet data as of December 31, 2014 and 2013 from our audited financial statements included in this annual report. We derived the selected statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and the balance sheet data as of December 31, 2012 , 2011 and 2010 from our audited financial statements not included in this annual report. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010 (1)
 
(in thousands, except share and per share data)
Operating revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Passenger
$
1,144,972

 
$
986,018

 
$
782,792

 
$
689,650

 
$
537,969

Non-ticket
786,608

 
668,367

 
535,596

 
381,536

 
243,296

Total operating revenue
1,931,580

 
1,654,385

 
1,318,388

 
1,071,186

 
781,265

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft fuel (2)
612,909

 
551,746

 
471,763

 
388,046

 
248,206

Salaries, wages and benefits
313,988

 
262,150

 
218,919

 
181,742

 
156,443

Aircraft rent
195,827

 
169,737

 
143,572

 
116,485

 
101,345

Landing fees and other rents
105,115

 
83,604

 
68,368

 
52,794

 
48,118

Distribution
74,823

 
67,481

 
56,668

 
51,349

 
41,179

Maintenance, materials and repairs
73,956

 
60,143

 
49,460

 
34,017

 
27,035

Depreciation and amortization
46,971

 
31,947

 
15,256

 
7,760

 
5,620

Other operating
149,675

 
144,586

 
127,886

 
91,172

 
83,748

Loss on disposal of assets
3,008

 
525

 
956

 
255

 
77

Special charges (credits) (3)
45

 
174

 
(8,450
)
 
3,184

 
621

Total operating expenses
1,576,317

 
1,372,093

 
1,144,398

 
926,804

 
712,392

Operating income
355,263

 
282,292

 
173,990

 
144,382

 
68,873

Other expense (income):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense (4)
2,747

 
214

 
1,350

 
24,781

 
50,313

Capitalized interest (5)
(2,747
)
 
(214
)
 
(1,350
)
 
(2,890
)
 
(1,491
)
Interest income
(336
)
 
(401
)
 
(925
)
 
(575
)
 
(328
)
Other expense
2,605

 
283

 
331

 
235

 
194

Total other expense (income)
2,269

 
(118
)
 
(594
)
 
21,551

 
48,688

Income before income taxes
352,994

 
282,410

 
174,584

 
122,831

 
20,185

Provision (benefit) for income taxes (6)
127,530

 
105,492

 
66,124

 
46,383

 
(52,296
)
Net income
$
225,464

 
$
176,918

 
$
108,460

 
$
76,448

 
$
72,481

Earnings Per Share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
3.10

 
$
2.44

 
$
1.50

 
$
1.44

 
$
2.77

Diluted
$
3.08

 
$
2.42

 
$
1.49

 
$
1.43

 
$
2.72

Weighted average shares outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
72,738,961

 
72,592,765

 
72,385,574

 
53,240,898

 
26,183,772

Diluted
73,293,869

 
72,999,221

 
72,590,574

 
53,515,348

 
26,689,855

 
(1)
We estimate that the 2010 pilot strike had a net negative impact on our operating income for 2010 of approximately $24 million consisting of an estimated $28 million in lost revenues and approximately $4 million of incremental costs resulting from the strike, offset in part by a reduction of variable expenses during the strike of approximately $8 million for flights not flown. Additionally, under the terms of the pilot contract, we also paid $2.3 million in return-to-work payments during the second quarter, which are not included in the strike impact costs described above.
(2)
Aircraft fuel expense is the sum of (i) “into-plane fuel cost,” which includes the cost of jet fuel and certain other charges such as fuel taxes and oil, (ii) realized gains and losses related to fuel derivative contracts and (iii) unrealized gains and losses related to fuel derivative contracts. The following table summarizes the components of aircraft fuel expense for the periods presented:

33



 
Year Ended December 31,

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

(in thousands)
Into-plane fuel cost
$
608,033


$
542,523


$
471,542


$
392,278


$
251,754

Realized losses (gains)
995


8,958


175


(7,436
)

(1,483
)
Unrealized mark-to-market losses (gains)
3,881


265


46


3,204


(2,065
)
Aircraft fuel expense
$
612,909


$
551,746


$
471,763


$
388,046


$
248,206


(3)
Special charges (credits) include: (i) for 2010, amounts relating to the sale of previously expensed MD-80 parts; (ii) for 2010 and 2011 amounts relating to exit facility costs associated with moving our Detroit, Michigan maintenance operations to Fort Lauderdale, Florida; (iii) termination costs in connection with the IPO during the three months ended June 30, 2011 comprised of amounts paid to Indigo Partners, LLC to terminate its professional services agreement with us and fees paid to three individual, unaffiliated holders of our subordinated notes; (iv) for 2011 and 2012, a $9.1 million gain related to the sale of four permanent air carrier slots at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) offset by costs connected with the 2012 secondary offerings; and for 2013, costs related to the 2013 secondary offering; (v) for 2013 and 2014, $0.1 million in costs related to the DCA exit. For more information, please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Our Operating Expenses—Special Charges (Credits).”
(4)
Substantially all of the interest expense recorded in 2010 and 2011 relates to notes and preferred stock held by our principal stockholders that were repaid or redeemed, or exchanged for shares of common stock, in connection with the Recapitalization in 2011 that was effected in connection with the IPO. Interest expense in 2012 and 2013 primarily relates to interest related to the TRA. Interest expense in 2014 primarily relates to interest related to the long-term debt, commitment fees and underpayment of Federal Excise Tax for fuel purchases during the period between July 1, 2009 and August 31, 2014.
(5)
Interest attributable to funds used to finance the acquisition of new aircraft, including PDPs is capitalized as an additional cost of the related asset.
(6)
Net income for 2010 includes a $52.3 million net tax benefit primarily due to the release of a valuation allowance resulting in a deferred tax benefit of $52.8 million in 2010. Absent the release of the valuation allowance and corresponding tax benefit, our net income would have been $19.7 million for 2010.
The following table presents balance sheet data for the periods presented:
 
As of December 31,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 Balance Sheet Data:
(in thousands)
Cash and cash equivalents
$
632,784

 
$
530,631

 
$
416,816

 
$
343,328

 
$
82,714

Total assets
1,602,981

 
1,180,765

 
919,884

 
745,813

 
475,757

Long-term debt, including current portion
146,248

 

 

 

 
260,827

Mandatorily redeemable preferred stock

 

 

 

 
79,717

Stockholders' equity (deficit)
1,003,075

 
769,117

 
582,535

 
466,706

 
(105,077
)



34



OPERATING STATISTICS
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Operating Statistics (unaudited) (A)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average aircraft
57.7

 
49.9

 
41.2

 
34.8

 
30.5

Aircraft at end of period
65

 
54

 
45

 
37

 
32

Airports served in the period (B)
56

 
56

 
55

 
50

 
41

Average daily Aircraft utilization (hours)
12.7

 
12.7

 
12.8

 
12.7

 
12.8

Average stage length (miles)
980

 
958

 
909

 
921

 
941

Block hours
267,305

 
231,148

 
192,403

 
161,898

 
141,864

Passenger flight segments (thousands)
14,294

 
12,414

 
10,423

 
8,518

 
6,952

Revenue passenger miles (RPMs) (thousands)
14,159,860

 
12,001,088

 
9,663,721

 
8,006,748

 
6,664,395

Available seat miles (ASMs) (thousands)
16,340,142

 
13,861,393

 
11,344,731

 
9,352,553

 
8,119,923

Load factor (%)
86.7

 
86.6

 
85.2

 
85.6

 
82.1

Average ticket revenue per passenger flight segment ($)
80.11

 
79.43

 
75.11

 
80.97

 
77.39

Average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment ($)
55.03

 
53.84

 
51.39

 
44.79

 
35.00

Total revenue per passenger segment ($)
135.14

 
133.27

 
126.50

 
125.76

 
112.39

Average yield (cents)
13.64

 
13.79

 
13.64

 
13.38

 
11.72

RASM (cents)
11.82

 
11.94

 
11.62

 
11.45

 
9.62

CASM (cents)
9.65

 
9.90

 
10.09

 
9.91

 
8.77

Adjusted CASM (cents) (C)
9.55

 
9.89

 
10.15

 
9.84

 
8.79

Adjusted CASM ex fuel (cents) (C)
5.88

 
5.91

 
6.00

 
5.72

 
5.71

Fuel gallons consumed (thousands)
200,498

 
171,931

 
142,991

 
121,030

 
106,628

Average economic fuel cost per gallon ($)
2.99

 
3.21

 
3.30

 
3.18

 
2.35

 
(A)
See “Glossary of Airline Terms” elsewhere in this annual report for definitions of terms used in this table.
(B)
Includes seasonal airports not served at the end of the period. Prior to 2013, we reported only airports served during the period with continuing operations.
(C)
Excludes special charges (credits) of $0.6 million (less than 0.01 cents per ASM) in 2010, $3.2 million (0.03 cents per ASM) in 2011, $(8.5) million ((0.07) cents per ASM) in 2012, $0.2 million (less than 0.01 cents per ASM) in 2013 and $0.0 million (less than 0.01 cents per ASM) in 2014. These amounts are excluded from all calculations of Adjusted CASM. Please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Our Operating Expenses—Special Charges (Credits).” Also excludes unrealized (gains) and losses related to fuel derivative contracts of $(2.1) million ((0.03) cents per ASM) in 2010, $3.2 million (0.03 cents per ASM) in 2011, $0.0 million (less than 0.01 cents per ASM) in 2012, $0.3 million (less than 0.01 cent per ASM) in 2013 and $3.9 million ( 0.02 cent s per ASM) in 2014. Please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates.”

35



ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
You should read the following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this annual report.

2014 Year in Review
The year 2014 marks the eighth consecutive year of profitability for us. We achieved a net income of $225.5 million ( $3.08 per share, diluted), compared to a net income of $176.9 million ( $2.42 per share, diluted) in 2013 . The increase in our net income was a result of our increased capacity, lower fuel cost as well as continued focus on low costs which help maintain our high profit margins.
For the year ended December 31, 2014 , we achieved an operating profit margin of 18.4% , the highest in our history, on $1,931.6 million in operating revenues. Our traffic grew by 18.0% as we continued to stimulate demand with ultra-low fares. Total revenue per passenger flight segment increased by 1.4% from $133.27 to $135.14 . Total RASM for 2014 was 11.82 cent s, a decrease of 1.0% compared to the prior year period, driven by lower operating yields on relatively stable load factors year over year.
Our operating cost structure is a primary area of focus and is at the core of our ULCC business model in which we compete solely on the basis of price. Our unit operating costs continue to be among the lowest of any airline in the Americas. During 2014 , we increased our capacity by 17.9% as we grew our fleet of Airbus single-aisle aircraft from 54 to 65 aircraft, including purchased aircraft for the first time in our history. We launched service to 23 new markets in 2014 and added one new destination: Kansas City.
During 2014 , we increased our average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment by 2.2% , or $1.19 , to $55.03 . Our total non-ticket revenue increased by 17.7% , or $118.2 million , to $786.6 million in 2014 . The year-over-year increase in average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment was primarily driven by a higher volume of passengers electing to purchase seat assignments, largely due to a software update completed in 2014 that enables us to sell seat assignments through more channels as well as a more rigorous approach to managing our seat inventory. Additionally, in July 2013, we increased our passenger usage fee (PUF), helping to drive the increase in PUF fees year over year.
During 2014 , our adjusted CASM ex-fuel decreased by 0.5% to 5.88 cent s. The decrease was primarily due to lower passenger re-accommodation expense year over year, due to better operational performance during 2014, as compared to 2013. We improved on-time performance year over year and maintained one of the highest completion factors in the industry. In addition, on a per ASM basis, distribution expense decreased, primarily due to a $2.9 million settlement gain received in 2014, and aircraft rent expense decreased due to reduced rent expense related to 14 A319 aircraft for which lease extensions with reduced rates were negotiated with the lessor at the end of the second quarter of 2013, providing for a full year of benefit in 2014 versus 2013. This decrease was partially offset by an increase in depreciation and amortization expense, landing fees and other rents expense, salaries, wages and benefits expense, and maintenance, materials and repairs expense per ASM.
During 2014, we grew our aicraft fleet by 20.4% and we took delivery of purchased aircraft for the first time in our history. As of December 31, 2014 , our 65 Airbus A320-family aircraft fleet was comprised of 29 A319s, 34 A320s and 2 A321s, of which 4 are owned and 61 are financed under operating leases. As of December 31, 2014 , our aircraft orders consisted of 101 A320 family aircraft with Airbus and 5 direct operating leases for A320neos with a third party, scheduled for delivery from 2015 through 2021 . Our plan calls for growing the fleet by 23.1% in 2015.
Operating Revenues
Our operating revenues are comprised of passenger revenues and non-ticket revenues.
Passenger Revenues . Passenger revenues consist of the base fares that customers pay for air travel.
Non-ticket Revenues. Non-ticket revenues are generated from air travel-related charges for baggage, passenger usage fee (PUF) for bookings through certain of our distribution channels, advance seat selection, itinerary changes, hotel travel packages and loyalty programs such as our FREE SPIRIT affinity credit card program and $9 Fare Club. Non-ticket revenues also include revenues derived from services not directly related to providing transportation such as the sale of advertising to third parties on our website and on board our aircraft.

36



Substantially all of our revenues are denominated in U.S. dollars. Passenger revenues are recognized once the related flight departs. Accordingly, the value of tickets sold in advance of travel is included under our current liabilities as “air traffic liability,” or ATL, until the related air travel is provided. Non-ticket revenues are generally recognized at the time the ancillary products are purchased or ancillary services are provided. Non-ticket revenues also include revenues from our subscription-based $9 Fare Club, which we recognize on a straight-line basis over 12 months. Revenue generated from the FREE SPIRIT credit card affinity program are recognized in accordance with the criteria as set forth in Accounting Standards Update ASU No. 2009-13. Please see “—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates—Frequent Flier Program.”
We recognize revenues net of certain taxes and airport passenger fees, which are collected by us on behalf of airports and governmental agencies and remitted to the applicable governmental entity or airport on a periodic basis. These taxes and fees include U.S. federal transportation taxes, federal security charges, airport passenger facility charges and foreign arrival and departure taxes. These items are collected from customers at the time they purchase their tickets, but are not included in our revenues. We record a liability upon collection from the customer and relieve the liability when payments are remitted to the applicable governmental agency or airport.
Operating Expenses
Our operating expenses consist of the following line items.
Aircraft Fuel. Aircraft fuel expense is our single largest operating expense. It includes the cost of jet fuel, related federal taxes, fueling into-plane fees and transportation fees. It also includes realized and unrealized gains and losses arising from any activity on our fuel derivatives. Our fuel derivatives generally consist of United States Gulf Coast jet fuel swaps (jet fuel swaps) and United States Gulf Coast jet fuel options (jet fuel options).
Salaries, Wages and Benefits. Salaries, wages and benefits expense includes the salaries, hourly wages, bonuses and equity compensation paid to employees for their services, as well as the related expenses associated with employee benefit plans and employer payroll taxes.
Aircraft Rent.  Aircraft rent expense consists of monthly lease rents for aircraft and spare engines under the terms of the related operating leases and is recognized on a straight-line basis. Aircraft rent expense also includes supplemental rent. Supplemental rent is made up of maintenance reserves paid or to be paid to aircraft lessors in advance of the performance of major maintenance activities that are not probable of being reimbursed and lease return condition obligations which we begin to accrue when they are probable. Aircraft rent expense is net of the amortization of gains and losses on sale and leaseback transactions on our flight equipment. As of December 31, 2014, 61 of our 65 aircraft and all our spare engines are financed under operating leases.
Landing Fees and Other Rents. Landing fees and other rents include both fixed and variable facilities expenses, such as the fees charged by airports for the use or lease of airport facilities, overfly fees paid to other countries and the monthly rent paid for our headquarters facility.
Distribution.  Distribution expense includes all of our direct costs including the cost of web support, our third-party call center, travel agent commissions and related GDS fees and credit card transaction fees, associated with the sale of our tickets and other products and services.
Maintenance, Materials and Repairs.  Maintenance, materials and repairs expense includes all parts, materials, repairs and fees for repairs performed by third-party vendors directly required to maintain our fleet. It excludes direct labor cost related to our own mechanics, which is included under salaries, wages and benefits. It also excludes the amortization of heavy maintenance expenses, which we defer under the deferral method of accounting and amortize as a component of depreciation and amortization expense.
Depreciation and Amortization. Depreciation and amortization expense includes the depreciation of fixed assets we own and leasehold improvements. It also includes the amortization of heavy maintenance expenses we defer under the deferral method of accounting for heavy maintenance events and recognize into expense on a straight-line or usage basis until the earlier of the next estimated heavy maintenance event or the aircraft's return at the end of the lease term.
Loss on Disposal of Assets.  Loss on disposal of assets includes the net losses on the disposal of our fixed assets.
Other Operating Expenses.  Other operating expenses include airport operations expense and fees charged by third-party vendors for ground handling services and food and liquor supply service expenses, passenger re-accommodation expense, the cost of passenger liability and aircraft hull insurance, all other insurance policies except for employee related insurance, travel and training expenses for crews and ground personnel, professional fees, personal property taxes and all other administrative

37



and operational overhead expenses. No individual item included in this category represented more than 5% of our total operating expenses.
Special Charges (Credits). Special charges (credits) include termination costs, secondary offering costs and the gain on the sale of take-off and landing slots.
In 2012, we sold four permanent air carrier slots at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) to another airline for $9.1 million . We recognized the $9.1 million gain within special charges (credits) in the third quarter of 2012, the period in which the FAA operating restriction lapsed and written confirmation of the slot transfer was received by the buyer from the FAA. 
Other Expense (Income)
Interest Expense. Interest expense in 2012 and 2013 primarily related to interest on the TRA. For 2014 , interest expense primarily represented interest related to the financing of purchased aircraft, interest related to the underpayment of prior year jet fuel FET and interest charged under the TRA.
Capitalized Interest. Capitalized interest represents interest cost incurred during the acquisition period of an aircraft which theoretically could have been avoided had we not made PDPs for that aircraft. These amounts are capitalized as part of the cost of the aircraft upon delivery. Capitalization of interest ceases when the asset is ready for service. Capitalized interest for 2012 and 2013 primarily related to interest incurred in connection with payments owed under the TRA. For 2014 , capitalized interest primarily related to interest incurred on long-term debt, underpayment of prior year jet fuel FET and interest charged under the TRA.
Other Expense. For 2014 , other expense included a charitable contribution of $1.0 million that is specifically creditable against current income tax in the State of Florida, as allowed under state law.
Income Taxes
We account for income taxes using the liability method. We record a valuation allowance to reduce the deferred tax assets reported if, based on the weight of the evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Deferred taxes are recorded based on differences between the financial statement basis and tax basis of assets and liabilities and available tax loss and credit carryforwards. In assessing the realizability of the deferred tax assets, we consider whether it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will be realized. In evaluating the ability to utilize our deferred tax assets, we consider all available evidence, both positive and negative, in determining future taxable income on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis.
In connection with our IPO in 2011, we entered into the TRA and thereby distributed immediately prior to the completion of the IPO to the holders of common stock as of such time, or the Pre-IPO Stockholders, the right to receive an amount equal to 90% of the cash savings in federal income tax realized by it by virtue of the use of the federal net operating loss, deferred interest deductions and alternative minimum tax credits held by us as of March 31, 2011, which was defined as the Pre-IPO NOL. Cash tax savings were generally computed by comparing actual federal income tax liability to the amount of such taxes that we would have been required to pay had such Pre-IPO NOLs (as defined in the TRA) not been available. Upon consummation of the IPO and execution of the TRA, we recorded a liability with an offsetting reduction to additional paid in capital. The amount and timing of payments under the TRA depended upon a number of factors, including, but not limited to, the amount and timing of taxable income generated in future periods and any limitations that may have been imposed on our ability to use the Pre-IPO NOLs. The term of the TRA was to continue until the first to occur (a) the full payment of all amounts required under the agreement with respect to utilization or expiration of all of the Pre-IPO NOLs, (b) the end of the taxable year including the tenth anniversary of the IPO or (c) a change in control of the Company.
In accordance with the TRA, we were required to submit a Tax Benefit Schedule showing the proposed TRA payout amount to the Stockholder Representatives within 45 calendar days of filing our tax return. Stockholder Representatives were defined as Indigo Pacific Partners, LLC and OCM FIE, LLC, representing the two largest ownership interest of pre-IPO shares. The Tax Benefit Schedule was to become final and binding on all parties unless a Stockholder Representative, within 45 calendar days after receiving such schedule, provided us with notice of a material objection to such schedule. If the parties, for any reason, were unable to successfully resolve the issues raised in any notice within 30 calendar days of receipt of such notice, we and the Stockholder Representatives had the right to employ the reconciliation procedures as set forth in the TRA. If the Tax Benefit Schedule was accepted, we then had five days after acceptance to make payments to the Pre-IPO stockholders. Pursuant to the TRA's reconciliation procedures, any disputes that could not be settled amicably, were to be settled by arbitration conducted by a single arbitrator jointly selected by both parties.
During the second quarter of 2012, we paid $27.2 million , or 90% of the 2011 tax savings realized from the utilization of NOLs, including $0.3 million of applicable interest, to the Pre-IPO Stockholders.

38



During 2013, we filed an amended 2009 income tax return which resulted in a reduction to the estimated TRA liability from $8.0 million to $5.6 million. On September 13, 2013, we filed our 2012 federal income tax return, and on October 14, 2013, we submitted a Tax Benefit Schedule to the Stockholder Representatives. On November 27, 2013, pursuant to the TRA, we received an objection notice to the Tax Benefit Schedule from the Stockholder Representatives. On April 7, 2014, we received a demand for arbitration from the Stockholder Representatives. Prior to commencing arbitration proceedings, on June 17, 2014, we and Stockholder Representatives agreed on a settlement amount of $7.0 million in addition to interest of $0.3 million. The agreed upon settlement was in excess of the outstanding liability of $5.6 million at the time of settlement. The excess payment of $1.4 million was recorded within other expense in the statement of operations and recorded as cash from operations in the statement of cash flows. As of December 31, 2014 , we had made all payments in accordance with the agreed upon settlement terms and had no outstanding obligations related to the TRA.

Trends and Uncertainties Affecting Our Business
We believe our operating and business performance is driven by various factors that affect airlines and their markets, trends affecting the broader travel industry and trends affecting the specific markets and customer base that we target. The following key factors may affect our future performance.
Competition . The airline industry is highly competitive. The principal competitive factors in the airline industry are fare pricing, total price, flight schedules, aircraft type, passenger amenities, number of routes served from a city, customer service, safety record and reputation, code-sharing relationships and frequent flier programs and redemption opportunities. Price competition occurs on a market-by-market basis through price discounts, changes in pricing structures, fare matching, target promotions and frequent flier initiatives. Airlines typically use discount fares and other promotions to stimulate traffic during normally slower travel periods to generate cash flow and to maximize unit revenue. The prevalence of discount fares can be particularly acute when a competitor has excess capacity that it is under financial pressure to sell.
Seasonality and Volatility . Our results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of those for the entire year because the air transportation business is subject to significant seasonal fluctuations. We generally expect demand to be greater in the second and third quarters compared to the rest of the year. The air transportation business is also volatile and highly affected by economic cycles and trends. Consumer confidence and discretionary spending, fear of terrorism or war, weakening economic conditions, fare initiatives, fluctuations in fuel prices, labor actions, changes in governmental regulations on taxes and fees, weather and other factors have resulted in significant fluctuations in revenues and results of operations in the past. We believe demand for business travel historically has been more sensitive to economic pressures than demand for low-price travel. Finally, a significant portion of our operations are concentrated in markets such as South Florida, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Northeast and northern Midwest regions of the United States, which are particularly vulnerable to weather, airport traffic constraints and other delays.
Aircraft Fuel . Fuel costs represent the single largest operating expense for most airlines, including ours. Fuel costs have been subject to wide price fluctuations in recent years. Fuel availability and pricing are also subject to refining capacity, periods of market surplus and shortage and demand for heating oil, gasoline and other petroleum products, as well as meteorological, economic and political factors and events occurring throughout the world, which we can neither control nor accurately predict. We source a significant portion of our fuel from refining resources located in the southeast United States, particularly facilities adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf Coast fuel is subject to volatility and supply disruptions, particularly in hurricane season when refinery shutdowns have occurred in recent years, or when the threat of weather-related disruptions has caused Gulf Coast fuel prices to spike above other regional sources. Our derivatives generally consist of United States Gulf Coast jet fuel swaps (jet fuel swaps) and United States Gulf Coast jet fuel options (jet fuel options). Both jet fuel swaps and jet fuel options are used at times to protect the refining price risk between the price of crude oil and the price of refined jet fuel, and to manage the risk of increasing fuel prices. Our fuel hedging practices are dependent upon many factors, including our assessment of market conditions for fuel, our access to the capital necessary to support margin requirements, the pricing of hedges and other derivative products in the market, our overall appetite for risk and applicable regulatory policies. As of December 31, 2014 , we had jet fuel option agreements in place to protect 88.7 million gallons, or approximately 35% of our 2015 anticipated fuel consumption, at a weighted-average ceiling price of $2.07 per gallon, which allows us to participate in falling oil prices. As of December 31, 2014 , we purchased all of our aircraft fuel under a single fuel service contract. The cost and future availability of jet fuel cannot be predicted with any degree of certainty.
Labor . The airline industry is heavily unionized. The wages, benefits and work rules of unionized airline industry employees are determined by collective bargaining agreements, or CBAs. Relations between air carriers and labor unions in the United States are governed by the RLA. Under the RLA, CBAs generally contain “amendable dates” rather than expiration dates, and the RLA requires that a carrier maintain the existing terms and conditions of employment following the amendable

39



date through a multi-stage and usually lengthy series of bargaining processes overseen by the NMB. This process continues until either the parties have reached agreement on a new CBA, or the parties have been released to “self-help” by the NMB. In most circumstances, the RLA prohibits strikes; however, after release by the NMB, carriers and unions are free to engage in self-help measures such as strikes and lockouts.
We have four union-represented employee groups comprising approximately 67% of our employees at December 31, 2014 . Our pilots are represented by the Airline Pilots Association, International, or ALPA, our flight attendants are represented by the Association of Flight Attendants, or AFA-CWA, our flight dispatchers are represented by the Transport Workers Union of America, or TWU, and our ramp service agents are represented by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, or IAM. Conflicts between airlines and their unions can lead to work slowdowns or stoppages. In June 2010, we experienced a five-day strike by our pilots, which caused us to shut down our flight operations. The strike ended as a result of our reaching a tentative agreement under a Return to Work Agreement and a full flight schedule was resumed on June 18, 2010. On August 1, 2010, we entered into a five-year collective bargaining agreement with our pilots. In August 2013, we entered into a five-year agreement with our flight dispatchers. In December 2013, with the help of the NMB, we reached a tentative agreement for a five-year contract with our flight attendants. The tentative agreement was subject to ratification by the flight attendant membership. On October 1, 2014, we were notified that the flight attendants voted to not ratify the tentative agreement. We will continue to work together with the AFA-CWA and the NMB with a goal of reaching a mutually beneficial agreement. On July 8, 2014, approximately 250 ramp service agents directly employed by the Company voted to be represented by the IAM. We have begun the process of negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with the IAM. We believe the five-year term of our CBAs is valuable in providing stability to our labor costs and provide us with competitive labor costs compared to other U.S.-based low-cost carriers. If we are unable to reach agreement with any of our unionized work groups in current or future negotiations regarding the terms of their CBAs, we may be subject to work interruptions or stoppages, such as the strike by our pilots in June 2010. A strike or other significant labor dispute with our unionized employees is likely to adversely affect our ability to conduct business.
Maintenance Expense . Maintenance expense grew through 2014 , 2013 and 2012 mainly as a result of the increasing age (approximately 5.1 years on average at December 31, 2014 ) and size of our fleet. As the fleet ages, we expect that maintenance costs will increase in absolute terms. The amount of total maintenance costs and related amortization of heavy maintenance (included in depreciation and amortization expense) is subject to many variables such as future utilization rates, average stage length, the interval between heavy maintenance events, the size and makeup of the fleet in future periods and the level of unscheduled maintenance events and their actual costs. Accordingly, we cannot reliably quantify future maintenance expenses for any significant period of time. However, we believe, based on our scheduled maintenance events, maintenance expense and maintenance-related amortization expense in 2015 will be approximately $126 million . In addition, we expect to capitalize $14 million of costs for heavy maintenance during 2015 .
As a result of a significant portion of our fleet being acquired over a relatively short period of time, heavy maintenance scheduled on each of our planes will occur at roughly the same time, meaning we will incur our most expensive scheduled maintenance obligations across our current fleet around the same time. These more significant maintenance activities will result in out-of-service periods during which our aircraft will be dedicated to maintenance activities and unavailable to fly revenue service. When accounting for maintenance expense under the deferral method, heavy maintenance is amortized over the shorter of either the remaining lease term or the next estimated heavy maintenance event. This will result in higher depreciation and amortization expense related to heavy maintenance in the last few years of the leases as compared to the costs in earlier periods. Please see “—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates—Aircraft Maintenance, Materials, Repair Costs and Related Heavy Maintenance Amortization.”
Maintenance Reserve Obligations . The terms of some of our aircraft lease agreements require us to post deposits for future maintenance, also known as maintenance reserves, to the lessor in advance of and as collateral for the performance of major maintenance events, resulting in our recording significant prepaid deposits on our balance sheet. As a result, the cash costs of scheduled major maintenance events are paid well in advance of the recognition of the maintenance event in our results of operations. Please see “—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates—Aircraft Maintenance, Materials, Repair Costs and Related Heavy Maintenance Amortization” and “—Maintenance Reserves.”
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based on our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of our financial statements. For a detailed discussion of our significant accounting policies, please see “Notes to Financial Statements—1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.”

40



Critical accounting policies are defined as those policies that reflect significant judgments or estimates about matters that are both inherently uncertain and material to our financial condition or results of operations.
Revenue Recognition. Revenues from tickets sold are initially deferred as ATL. Passenger revenues are recognized when transportation is provided. An unused non-refundable ticket expires at the date of scheduled travel and is recognized as revenue for the expired ticket value at the date of scheduled travel.
Our most significant non-ticket revenues include revenues generated from air travel-related services paid for baggage, bookings through our call center or third-party vendors, advance seat selection, itinerary changes and loyalty programs, and are recognized at the time products are purchased or ancillary services are provided. These revenues also include commissions from the sales of hotel rooms, trip insurance and rental cars recognized at the time the service is rendered. Non-ticket revenues also include revenues from our subscription-based $9 Fare Club, recognized on a straight-line basis over 12 months.
Customers may elect to change their itinerary prior to the date of departure. A service charge is assessed and recognized on the date the change is initiated and is deducted from the face value of the original purchase price of the ticket, and the original ticket becomes invalid. The amount remaining after deducting the service charge is called a credit shell which expires 60 days from the date the credit shell is created and can be used towards the purchase of a new ticket and our other service offerings. The amount of credits expected to expire is recognized as revenue upon issuance of the credit and is estimated based on historical experience. Estimating the amount of credits that will go unused involves some level of subjectivity and judgment.
Accounting for property and equipment. Property and equipment is stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation of operating property and equipment is computed using the straight-line method applied to each unit of property. Property under capital leases and related obligations are initially recorded at an amount equal to the present value of future minimum lease payments computed using the Company's incremental borrowing rate or, when known, the interest rate implicit in the lease. Amortization of property under capital leases is on a straight-line basis over the lease term and is included in depreciation and amortization expense. In accounting for property and equipment, we must make estimates about the expected useful lives of the assets, the expected residual values of the assets, and the potential for impairment based on the fair value of the assets and their future expected cash flows.
The depreciable lives used for the principal depreciable asset classifications are:
 
Estimated Useful Life
Aircraft
25 years
Spare rotables and flight assemblies
7 to 15 years
Other equipment and vehicles
5 to 7 years
Internal use software
3 to 10 years
Capital lease
Lease term
Leasehold improvements
Lesser of lease term or estimated useful life of the improvement
As of December 31, 2014 , we had 4 aircraft capitalized within flight equipment with depreciable lives of 25 years and 61 aircraft financed through operating leases with terms of 3 to 15 years . All spare engines are financed through operating leases with terms of 7 to 12 years . Residual values for aircraft, major spare rotable parts, avionics and assemblies are estimated to be 10% .
We record impairment charges on long-lived assets used in operations when events and circumstances indicate that the assets may be impaired, the undiscounted cash flows estimated to be generated by those assets are less than the carrying amount of those assets, and the net book value of the assets exceeds their estimated fair value. In making these determinations, we use certain assumptions, including, but not limited to: (i) estimated fair value of the assets; and (ii) estimated, undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by these assets, which are based on additional assumptions such as asset utilization, length of service the asset will be used in our operations, and estimated salvage values.
Frequent Flier Program. We accrue for mileage credits earned through travel, including mileage credits for members with an insufficient number of mileage credits to earn an award, under our FREE SPIRIT program based on the estimated incremental cost of providing free travel for credits that are expected to be redeemed. Incremental costs include fuel, insurance, security, ticketing and facility charges reduced by an estimate of amounts required to be paid by the passenger when redeeming the award.

41



Under our affinity card program, funds received for the marketing of a co-branded Spirit credit card and delivery of award miles are accounted for as a mulitple-deliverable arrangement. At the inception of the arrangement, we evaluated all deliverables in the arrangement to determine whether they represent separate units of accounting. We determined the arrangement had three separate units of accounting: (i) travel miles to be awarded, (ii) licensing of brand and access to member lists and (iii) advertising and marketing efforts. At inception of the arrangement, we established the relative selling price for all deliverables that qualified for separation, as arrangement consideration should be allocated based on relative selling price. The manner in which the selling price was established was based on the applicable hierarchy of evidence. Total arrangement consideration was then allocated to each deliverable on the basis of the deliverable's relative selling price. In considering the hierarchy of evidence, we first determined whether vendor-specific objective evidence of selling price or third-party evidence of selling price existed. We determined that neither vendor-specific objective evidence of selling price nor third-party evidence existed due to the uniqueness of our program. As such, we developed our best estimate of the selling price for all deliverables. For the selling price of travel, we considered a number of entity-specific factors including the number of miles needed to redeem an award, average fare of comparable segments, breakage, restrictions and other charges. For licensing of brand and access to member lists, we considered both market-specific factors and entity-specific factors, including general profit margins realized in the marketplace/industry, brand power, market royalty rates and size of customer base. For the advertising and marketing element, we considered market-specific factors and entity-specific factors including, our internal costs (and fluctuations of costs) of providing services, volume of marketing efforts and overall advertising plan. Consideration allocated based on the relative selling price to both brand licensing and advertising elements is recognized as revenue when earned and recorded in non-ticket revenue. Consideration allocated to award miles is deferred and recognized ratably as passenger revenue over the estimated period the transportation is expected to be provided which is currently estimated at 14 months . We used entity-specific assumptions coupled with the various judgments necessary to determine the selling price of a deliverable in accordance with the required selling price hierarchy. Changes in these assumptions could result in changes in the estimated selling prices. Determining the frequency to reassess selling price for individual deliverables requires significant judgment. For additional information, please see “Notes to Financial Statements—1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies—Frequent Flier Program”.
Aircraft Maintenance, Materials, Repair Costs and Related Heavy Maintenance Amortization. We account for heavy maintenance under the deferral method. Under the deferral method the cost of heavy maintenance is capitalized and amortized as a component of depreciation and amortization expense until the earlier of the next estimated heavy maintenance event or the aircraft's return at the end of the lease term. Amortization of engine and aircraft overhaul costs was $35.8 million , $23.6 million and $9.1 million for the years ended December 31, 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively. If heavy maintenance costs were amortized within maintenance, material and repairs expense in the statement of operations, our maintenance, material and repairs expense would have been $109.8 million , $83.8 million and $58.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively. During the years ended December 31, 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , we capitalized $33.6 million , $70.8 million and $61.6 million of costs for heavy maintenance, respectively. The timing of the next heavy maintenance event is estimated based on assumptions including estimated usage, FAA-mandated maintenance intervals and average removal times as suggested by the manufacturer. These assumptions may change based on changes in our utilization of our aircraft, changes in government regulations and suggested manufacturer maintenance intervals. In addition, these assumptions can be affected by unplanned incidents that could damage an airframe, engine or major component to a level that would require a heavy maintenance event prior to a scheduled maintenance event. To the extent our planned usage increases, the estimated life would decrease before the next maintenance event, resulting in additional expense over a shorter period. Heavy maintenance events include 6-year and 12-year airframe checks, engine overhauls, LLP replacement and overhauls to major components. Certain maintenance functions are outsourced under contracts that require payment based on a performance measure such as flight hours. Costs incurred for maintenance and repair under flight hour maintenance contracts, where labor and materials price risks have been transferred to the service provider, are accrued based on contractual payment terms. Routine cost for maintaining the airframes and engines and line maintenance are charged to maintenance, materials and repairs expense as performed.
Maintenance Reserves . Some of our master lease agreements provide that we pay maintenance reserves to aircraft lessors to be held as collateral in advance of our performance of major maintenance activities. These lease agreements provide that maintenance reserves are reimbursable to us upon completion of the maintenance event in an amount equal to either (1) the amount of the maintenance reserve held by the lessor associated with the specific maintenance event or (2) the qualifying costs related to the specific maintenance event. Substantially all of these maintenance reserve payments are calculated based on a utilization measure, such as flight hours or cycles and are used solely to collateralize the lessor for maintenance time run off the aircraft until the completion of the maintenance of the aircraft.
At lease inception and at each balance sheet date, we assess whether the maintenance reserve payments required by the master lease agreements are substantively and contractually related to the maintenance of the leased asset. Maintenance reserve payments that are substantively and contractually related to the maintenance of the leased asset are accounted for as maintenance deposits. Maintenance deposits expected to be recovered from lessors are reflected as prepaid maintenance

42



deposits in the accompanying balance sheets. When it is not probable we will recover amounts currently on deposit with a lessor, such amounts are expensed as supplemental rent. Because we are required to pay maintenance reserves for our operating leased aircraft, and we choose to apply the deferral method for maintenance accounting, management expects that the final heavy maintenance events will be amortized over the remaining lease term rather than over the next estimated heavy maintenance event. As a result, our maintenance costs in the last few years of leases could be significantly in excess of the costs in earlier periods. In addition, these late periods could include additional costs from unrecoverable maintenance reserve payments required in the late years of the lease. We expensed $1.6 million , $1.9 million and $2.0 million of paid maintenance reserves as supplemental rent during 2014 , 2013 and 2012 , respectively.
As of December 31, 2014 and 2013 , we had prepaid maintenance deposits of $250.0 million and $220.7 million , respectively, on our balance sheets. We have concluded that these prepaid maintenance deposits are probable of recovery primarily due to the rate differential between the maintenance reserve payments and the expected cost for the related next maintenance event that the reserves serve to collateralize.
These master lease agreements also provide that most maintenance reserves held by the lessor at the expiration of the lease are nonrefundable to us and will be retained by the lessor. Consequently, we have determined that any usage-based maintenance reserve payments after the last major maintenance event are not substantively related to the maintenance of the leased asset and therefore are accounted for as contingent rent. We accrue contingent rent beginning when it becomes probable and reasonably estimable we will incur such nonrefundable maintenance reserve payments. We make certain assumptions at the inception of the lease and at each balance sheet date to determine the recoverability of maintenance deposits. These assumptions are based on various factors such as the estimated time between the maintenance events, the cost of future maintenance events and the number of flight hours the aircraft is estimated to be utilized before it is returned to the lessor. Maintenance reserves held by lessors that are refundable to us at the expiration of the lease are accounted for as prepaid maintenance deposits on the balance sheet when they are paid.
Leased Aircraft Return Costs . Our aircraft lease agreements often contain provisions that require us to return aircraft airframes and engines to the lessor in a certain maintenance condition or pay an amount to the lessor based on the airframe and engine's actual return condition. Lease return costs will be recognized as expense beginning when it is probable that such costs will be incurred and they can be estimated. Incurrence of lease return costs becomes probable and the amount of those costs can typically be estimated near the end of the lease term (that is, after the aircraft has completed its last maintenance cycle prior to being returned). We will evaluate all lease return conditions after the second to last maintenance event as it relates to the respective component or airframe from the lease return. If at this point it becomes both probable and estimable that a return cost will be incurred, we will accrue the cost on a straight-line basis as contingent rent through the remaining lease term. Return costs are recorded as a component of supplemental rent.
Results of Operations
In 2014 , we generated operating revenues of $1,931.6 million and operating income of $355.3 million resulting in an 18.4% operating margin and net earnings of $225.5 million . In 2013 , we generated operating revenues of $1,654.4 million and operating income of $282.3 million resulting in a 17.1%  operating margin and net earnings of $176.9 million . Operating revenues increased year over year mainly as a result of an 18.0% increase in traffic, as compared to prior year. The increase in operating income in 2014 over 2013 of $73.0 million , is mainly due to a 16.8% increase in revenue partially offset by increased fuel and other expenses resulting from an increase in operations. Fuel costs increase d by $61.2 million during 2014 compared to 2013 , primarily driven by a 16.6% increase in consumption offset by a lower fuel cost per gallon year over year. Operating expenses increase d primarily due to our growth in capacity resulting from the addition of eleven aircraft to our fleet and our route network expansion.
As of December 31, 2014 , our cash and cash equivalents grew to $632.8 million , an increase of $102.2 million compared to the prior year, mainly driven by cash from our operating activities offset by cash used to fund PDPs and capital expenditures.

43



Operating Revenues
 
Year Ended 2014
 
% change 2014 versus 2013
 
Year Ended 2013
 
% change 2013 versus 2012
 
Year Ended 2012
Passenger
$
1,144,972

 
16.1%
 
$
986,018

 
26.0%
 
$
782,792

Non-ticket
786,608

 
17.7%
 
668,367

 
24.8%
 
535,596

Total operating revenue
$
1,931,580

 
16.8%
 
$
1,654,385

 
25.5%
 
$
1,318,388

RASM (cents)
11.82

 
(1.0)%
 
11.94

 
2.8%
 
11.62

Average ticket revenue per passenger flight segment
$
80.11

 
0.9%
 
$
79.43

 
5.8%
 
$
75.11

Average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment
$
55.03

 
2.2%
 
$
53.84

 
4.8%
 
$
51.39

Total revenue per passenger flight segment
$
135.14

 
1.4%
 
$
133.27

 
5.4%
 
$
126.50


2014 compared to 2013
Operating revenue increase d by $277.2 million , or 16.8% , to $1,931.6 million in 2014 compared to 2013, primarily due to an increase in traffic of 18.0% , offset slightly by a decrease in average yield of 1.1% to 13.64 cents.
Our results for 2014 were driven by a capacity increase of 17.9% compared to 2013, while maintaining a high load factor of 86.7% . Total RASM for 2014 was 11.82 cent s, a decrease of 1.0% compared to 2013, as a result of lower operating yields on relatively stable load factors. Total revenue per passenger flight segment increase d 1.4% from $133.27 in 2013 to $135.14 in 2014 . The year-over-year increase in total revenue per passenger flight segment is due to higher non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment offset by lower ticket revenue per passenger flight segment.

During 2014 , we increased our average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment by 2.2% , or $1.19 , to $55.03 . Our total non-ticket revenue increased by 17.7% , or $118.2 million , to $786.6 million in 2014 . The year-over-year increase in average non-ticket revenue per passenger flight segment was primarily driven by a higher volume of passengers electing to purchase seat assignments, largely due to a software update completed in 2014 that enables us to sell seat assignments through more channels as well as a more rigorous approach to managing our seat inventory. Additionally, in July 2013, we increased our passenger usage fee (PUF), helping to drive the increase in PUF fees year over year.

2013 compared to 2012
Operating revenues increase d by $336.0 million , or 25.5% , to $1,654.4 million in 2013 compared to 2012 as we increased traffic by 24.2% and improved our average yield by 1.1% to 13.79 cents.
Our results for 2013 were driven by a capacity increase of 22.2% compared to 2012, while maintaining a high load factor of 86.6%, and an increase of 1.4 points compared to 2012. In addition, the year-over-year increase was partly attributable to the negative revenue impact in the fourth quarter 2012 related to Hurricane Sandy which we estimated to be $25 million. Total RASM for 2013 was 11.94 cents, an increase of 2.8% compared to 2012, as a result of higher average passenger yields and higher load factor. Total revenue per passenger flight segment increased 5.4% from $126.50 in 2012 to $133.27 in 2013.
Non-ticket revenue increased 24.8% in 2013, as compared to 2012, mainly due to a 24.2% increase in traffic and an increase in baggage revenue per passenger flight segment. Non-ticket revenue as a percentage of total revenue remained relatively stable from 40.6% for 2012 to 40.4% for 2013. On a per passenger segment basis, the increase in non-ticket revenue was attributable to changes in our bag fee schedule which better optimized revenue by channel. Additionally, during June 2012 and July 2013, we made adjustments to our PUF, helping to drive the increase in PUF fees year over year.
Stronger demand throughout 2013, particularly in the second half of the year, as compared to 2012, allowed us to better leverage our ability to revenue manage our inventory, resulting in higher ticket revenue per passenger segment. Our average ticket fare per passenger flight segment increased 5.8% from $75.11 in 2012 to $79.43 in 2013.

44



Operating Expenses
Since adopting our ULCC model, we have continuously sought to reduce our unit operating costs and have created one of the industry's lowest cost structures in the Americas. The table below presents our operating expenses, as a percentage of operating revenue for the last three years, as well as unit operating costs (CASM).
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
% of
Revenue
 
CASM
 
% of
Revenue
 
CASM
 
% of
Revenue
 
CASM
Operating revenue
100.0
%
 
 
 
100.0
%
 
 
 
100.0
 %
 
 
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft fuel (1)
31.7
%
 

3.75
¢
 
33.4
%
 

3.98
¢
 
35.8
 %
 

4.16
¢
Salaries, wages and benefits
16.3

 
1.92

 
15.8

 
1.89

 
16.6

 
1.93

Aircraft rent
10.1

 
1.20

 
10.3

 
1.22

 
10.9

 
1.27

Landing fees and other rentals
5.4

 
0.64

 
5.1

 
0.60

 
5.2

 
0.60

Distribution
3.9

 
0.46

 
4.1

 
0.49

 
4.3

 
0.50

Maintenance, materials and repairs
3.8

 
0.45

 
3.6

 
0.43

 
3.8

 
0.44

Depreciation and amortization
2.4

 
0.29

 
1.9

 
0.23

 
1.2

 
0.13

Other operating expenses
7.7

 
0.92

 
8.7

 
1.04

 
9.7

 
1.13

Loss on disposal of assets
0.2

 
0.02

 

 

 
0.1

 
0.01

Special charges (credits) (2)

 

 

 

 
(0.6
)
 
(0.07
)
Total operating expense
81.6
%
 
 
 
82.9
%
 
 
 
86.8
 %
 
 
CASM
 
 

9.65
¢
 
 
 

9.90
¢
 
 
 

10.09
¢
Unrealized gains and losses related to fuel derivative contracts per ASM
 
 
0.02

 
 
 

 
 
 

Loss (gains) on disposal of assets per ASM
 
 
0.02

 
 
 

 
 
 
0.01

Special charges (credits) per ASM
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
(0.07
)
Prior years' additional federal excise tax per ASM
 
 
0.06

 
 
 

 
 
 

Adjusted CASM (3)
 
 
9.55

 
 
 
9.89

 
 
 
10.15

Adjusted CASM ex fuel (4)
 
 
5.88

 
 
 
5.91

 
 
 
6.00

(1)
Aircraft fuel expense is the sum of (i) “into-plane fuel cost,” which includes the cost of jet fuel and certain other charges such as fuel taxes and oil, (ii) realized gains and losses related to fuel derivative contracts and (iii) unrealized gains and losses related to fuel derivative contracts. The following table summarizes the components of aircraft fuel expense for the periods presented:
 
Year Ended December 31,
2014
 
2013
 
2012
(in thousands)
Into-plane fuel cost
$
608,033

 
$
542,523

 
$
471,542

Realized losses (gains)
995

 
8,958

 
175

Unrealized mark-to-market losses (gains)
3,881

 
265

 
46

Aircraft fuel
$
612,909

 
$
551,746

 
$
471,763

(2)
Includes special charges (credits) of $(8.5) million ((0.07) cents per ASM) in 2012. Special charges (credits) for 2012 primarily include a $9.1 million gain related to the sale of four permanent air carrier slots at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA), offset by $0.6 million in secondary offering costs. Please see “—Our Operating Expenses—Special Charges (Credits).”
(3)
For 2014, adjusted CASM excludes unrealized losses related to fuel derivative contracts of 0.02 cent per ASM, loss on disposal of assets of 0.02 cents per ASM, special charges of less than 0.01 cent per ASM, and prior year jet fuel FET of 0.06 cents per ASM. For the 2013, adjusted CASM excludes unrealized losses related to fuel derivative contracts of less than 0.01 cents per ASM, loss on disposal of assets of less than 0.01 cent per ASM, and special charges of less than 0.01 cent per ASM. For 2012, adjusted CASM excludes unrealized losses related to fuel derivative contracts of less than 0.01 cents per ASM, loss on disposal of assets of 0.01 cent per ASM, and special charges (credits) of (0.07) cent per ASM.
(4)
Excludes aircraft fuel expense, loss on disposal of assets, and special charges and credits.


45



2014 compared to 2013
Operating expense increased by $204.2 million , or 14.9% , in 2014 primarily due to our 17.9% growth in capacity as well as higher amortization of heavy maintenance events on our aircraft.
Our adjusted CASM ex fuel for 2014   decrease d by  0.5%  as compared to 2013. The decrease was primarily due to lower passenger re-accommodation expense year over year, due to better operational performance during 2014, as compared to 2013. In addition, on a per ASM basis, distribution expense decreased, primarily due to a $2.9 million settlement gain received in 2014, and aircraft rent expense decreased due to reduced rent expense related to 14 A319 aircraft for which lease extensions with reduced rates were negotiated with the lessor at the end of the second quarter of 2013, providing for a full year of benefit in 2014 versus 7 months of benefit in 2013. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in depreciation and amortization expense, landing fees and other rents expense, salaries, wages and benefits expense, and maintenance, materials and repairs expense per ASM.
Aircraft fuel expenses includes both into-plane expense (as defined below) and realized and unrealized net gains or losses from fuel derivatives. Into-plane fuel expense is defined as the price that we generally pay at the airport, or the “into-plane” price, including taxes and fees. Into-plane fuel prices are affected by the global oil market, refining costs, transportation taxes and fees, which can vary by region in the United States and other countries where we operate. Into-plane fuel expense approximates cash paid to the supplier and does not reflect the effect of our fuel derivatives. Management chose not to elect hedge accounting on any fuel derivative instruments during 2014 or 2013 and, as a result, changes in the fair value of these fuel derivative contracts are recorded each period as a component of aircraft fuel expense.
During the third quarter of 2014, we became aware of an underpayment of Federal Excise Tax (FET) for fuel purchases during the period between July 1, 2009 and August 31, 2014. The commencement of the period in which we underpaid FET coincided with a change in our fuel service provider that took place in July 2009. The amount of underpayment of jet fuel FET from July 1, 2009 through December 31, 2013 was $9.3 million along with an additional $2.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. The total amount of $11.4 million is recorded within aircraft fuel expense in the statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2014, and considered a component of into-plane fuel expense. Approximately, $0.8 million of interest was incurred related to the past-due tax payments.
Aircraft fuel expense, our largest operating cost as a percentage of operating expenses, increase d by 11.1% from $551.7 million in 2013 to $612.9 million in 2014 . The increase was primarily due to a 16.6% increase in fuel gallons consumed as well as an additional $9.3 million recorded in the third quarter of 2014 for unpaid jet fuel FET related to prior years, partially offset by a 6.9% decrease in fuel prices per gallon.
The elements of the changes in aircraft fuel expense are illustrated in the following table:

 
Year Ended December 31,
 

 
2014
 
2013
 
 
(in thousands, except per gallon amounts)
 
Percent Change
Fuel gallons consumed
200,498

 
171,931

 
16.6
 %
Into-plane fuel cost per gallon
$
3.03

 
$
3.16

 
(4.1
)%
Into-plane fuel expense
$
608,033

 
$
542,523

 
12.1
 %
Realized (gains) and losses related to fuel derivative contracts
995

 
8,958

 
(88.9
)%
Unrealized (gains) and losses related to fuel derivative contracts
3,881


265


1,364.5
 %
Aircraft fuel expense (per Statement of Operations)
$
612,909

 
$
551,746

 
11.1
 %

Gulf Coast Jet indexed fuel is the basis for a substantial majority of our fuel consumption and is impacted by both the price of crude oil as well as increases or decreases in refining margins associated with the conversion of crude oil to jet fuel. The into-plane fuel cost per gallon decrease of 4.1% was primarily a result of a decrease in jet fuel prices partially offset by an additional $9.3 million for prior year unpaid jet fuel FET recorded in the third quarter of 2014.
We track economic fuel expense, which we believe is the best measure of the effect fuel prices are currently having on our business, because it most closely approximates the net cash outflow associated with purchasing fuel used for our operations during the period. We define economic fuel expense as into-plane fuel expense and realized gains or losses on derivative contracts. The key difference between aircraft fuel expense, as recorded in our statement of operations, and economic fuel

46



expense is unrealized mark-to-market changes in the value of aircraft fuel derivatives outstanding. In addition, in our calculation for economic fuel price for the current year, we are excluding the prior years' additional jet fuel FET amount of $9.3 million expensed in the third quarter of 2014, but including the year-to-date 2014 additional jet fuel FET amount of $2.1 million. Many industry analysts evaluate airline results using economic fuel expense and it is used in our internal management reporting.
The elements of the changes in economic fuel expense are illustrated in the following table:

 
Year Ended December 31,
 

 
2014
 
2013
 
 
(in thousands, except per gallon amounts)
 
Percent Change
Into-plane fuel expense
$
608,033

 
$
542,523

 
12.1
 %
Realized (gains) and losses related to fuel derivative contracts
995


8,958


(88.9
)%
Prior years' additional federal excise tax
(9,278
)



100.0
 %
Economic fuel expense
$
599,750


$
551,481


8.8
 %
Fuel gallons consumed
200,498

 
171,931

 
16.6
 %
Economic fuel cost per gallon
$
2.99

 
$
3.21

 
(6.9
)%

Fuel gallons consumed increase d 16.6% as a result of increased operations, as evidenced by a 15.6% increase in block hours.
We did not pay or receive cash from any fuel derivatives that settled during the twelve months ended December 31, 2014 . Total net loss recognized for derivatives that settled during the twelve months ended December 31, 2013 was $9.0 million . This amount represents the net cash paid for the settlement of derivatives. We paid $1.0 million in premiums for fuel options which expired during the twelve months ended December 31, 2014 . We did not have any fuel options expire during the twelve months ended December 31, 2013 . We had $3.9 million in unrealized gains and losses related to our outstanding fuel derivatives during the twelve months ended December 31, 2014 . Total unrealized losses arising from mark-to-market adjustments to our outstanding fuel derivatives for the twelve months ended December 31, 2013 was $0.3 million .
Labor costs in 2014 increase d by $51.8 million , or 19.8% , compared to 2013, due mainly to a 19.1% increase in our pilot and flight attendant workforce required to operate the eleven new aircraft deliveries in 2014 and the implementation of new crew duty and rest rules (FAR 117) beginning in January of 2014, which resulted in the hiring of additional pilots to fly our schedule. On a per-ASM basis, labor costs increase d primarily due to an increase in our group health care costs and the implementation of FAR 117, which resulted in carrying a higher ratio of pilots compared to the prior period.
During 2014 , aircraft rent increase d $26.1 million , or 15.4% , compared to 2013. This increase was primarily driven by the delivery of seven new leased aircraft during 2014 . On a per-ASM basis, aircraft rent expense decrease d due to lease extensions that effectively lowered the lease rate for 14 A319 aircraft at the end of the second quarter of 2013, providing for a full year of benefit in 2014 versus 7 months of benefit in 2013. In addition, we had the delivery of four purchased aircraft during the fourth quarter of 2014 that increased capacity but had no affect on aircraft rent expense as these assets are being depreciated over their useful life.

Landing fees and other rents for  2014   increase d by  $21.5 million , or  25.7% , compared to 2013 primarily due to a  13.6%   increase  in departures as well as increased volume at higher cost airports. On a per-ASM basis, landing fees and other rents increase d, as compared to the prior year period, due to increased rates at certain airports, expiration of incentives, as well as increased volume at higher-cost airports.
The increase in distribution expense of $7.3 million , or 10.9% , in 2014 compared to 2013 was primarily due to increased sales volume and an increase of approximately 0.9 percentage points, year over year, in sales from third-party travel agents, which are more expensive than selling directly through our website. On a per-ASM basis, distribution expense decrease d primarily due to a $2.9 million settlement gain received in 2014.

47



The following table shows our distribution channel usage:
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
Change
Website
61.1
%
 
61.0
%
 
0.1

Third-party travel agents
34.4

 
33.5

 
0.9

Call center
4.5

 
5.5

 
(1.0
)
Maintenance, materials and repair costs increase d by $13.8 million , or 23.0% , in 2014 , as compared to 2013. The increase in maintenance costs was primarily due to the aging of our fleet, which requires more comprehensive work during routine scheduled maintenance, as well as the timing of the mix of maintenance checks performed during 2014 as compared to 2013 . In addition, during the third quarter of 2014, we recorded $2.3 million of expense in connection with an engine failure incident that occurred in 2013. For a detailed discussion of the engine expense, please see Note 1. In addition, the increase in maintenance costs on a dollar basis and per unit basis resulted from an increase in both the number and cost of scheduled maintenance events during the year ended December 31, 2014, as compared to the prior year. We expect maintenance expense to increase significantly as our fleet continues to grow and age, resulting in the need for additional or more frequent repairs over time.
Depreciation and amortization increase d by $15.0 million , or 47.0% , primarily due to higher amortization of deferred heavy maintenance. As our fleet continues to age, the amount of deferred heavy maintenance events capitalized will increase and will result in an increase in the amortization of those costs.
Other operating expenses in 2014 increase d by $5.1 million , or 3.5% , compared to 2013 primarily due to an increase in departures of 13.6% and our overall growth. On a per-ASM basis, our other operating expenses decrease d, as compared to the same period in 2013, due to lower passenger re-accommodation expense resulting from improved operational reliability.
2013 compared to 2012
Operating expense increased by $227.7 million, or 19.9%, in 2013 primarily due to our 22.2% growth in capacity as well as higher amortization of heavy maintenance events on our aircraft.
Our adjusted CASM ex fuel for 2013 decreased by 1.5% as compared to 2012. Better operational performance during 2013 as compared to 2012 helped drive lower wages and passenger re-accommodation expenses. In addition, during 2013, we entered into lease extensions covering 14 of our existing A319 aircraft resulting in reduced lease rates for the remaining term of the leases which contributed to the decrease in adjusted CASM ex-fuel as compared to 2012. These decreases were partially offset by higher heavy maintenance amortization expense for 2013 resulting from the increase in deferred heavy aircraft maintenance events as compared to 2012.
Aircraft fuel expense increased by 17% from $471.8 million in 2012 to $551.7 million in 2013. The increase was primarily due to a 20.2% increase in fuel gallons consumed partially offset by a 2.7% decrease in fuel prices per gallon.

48



The difference between aircraft fuel expense and economic fuel expense and the elements of the changes are illustrated in the following table:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 

 
2013
 
2012
 
 
(in thousands, except per gallon amounts)
 
Percent Change
Into-plane fuel expense
$
542,523

 
$
471,542

 
15.1
 %
Realized (gains) and losses related to fuel derivative contracts
8,958

 
175

 
5,018.9
 %
Economic fuel expense
551,481

 
471,717

 
16.9
 %
Unrealized (gains) and losses related to fuel derivative contracts
265

 
46

 
476.1
 %
Aircraft fuel expense (per Statement of Operations)
$
551,746

 
$
471,763

 
17.0
 %
Fuel gallons consumed
171,931

 
142,991

 
20.2
 %
Economic fuel cost per gallon
$
3.21

 
$
3.30

 
(2.7
)%
Into-plane fuel cost per gallon
$
3.16

 
$
3.30

 
(4.2
)%
Fuel gallons consumed increased 20.2% as a result of increased operations, as evidenced by a 20.1% increase in block hours.
Total net loss recognized for fuel derivatives that settled during 2013 was $9.0 million, compared to a net loss of $0.2 million in 2012. These amounts represent the net cash paid (received) for the settlement of fuel derivatives.
Labor costs in 2013 increased by $43.2 million, or 19.7%, compared to 2012, due mainly to a 30.9% increase in our pilot and flight attendant workforce required to operate the nine aircraft deliveries in 2013. On a per-ASM basis, labor costs decreased as a result of better operational performance during 2013 as compared to 2012, which helped drive lower crew-related salary expenses during 2013.
During 2013, aircraft rent increased $26.2 million, or 18.2%, compared to 2012. This increase was primarily driven by the delivery of nine aircraft during 2013. On a per-ASM basis, aircraft rent expense decreased as a result of the modification and extension of 14 A319 aircraft leases. The modification resulted in reduced lease rates for the remaining term of these leases. This reduction was slightly offset by higher supplemental rent on three 40-month aircraft leases taken during late 2012 and early 2013.

Landing fees and other rents for 2013 increased by $15.2 million, or 22.3%, compared to 2012 primarily due to a 14.9% increase in departures as well as increased volume at higher cost airports. On a per-ASM basis, landing fees and other rents remained flat as increased volume at higher-cost airports were offset by the increase in capacity which outpaced the increase of departures due to higher stage length year over year.
The increase in distribution expense of $10.8 million, or 19.1%, in 2013 compared to 2012 was primarily due to increased sales volume driving up credit card fees as well as an increase of approximately 6.3 percentage points year over year in the percentage of sales from third-party travel agents, which are more expensive than sales directly through our website. This shift in distribution mix did not materially affect operating income because the revenues received from sales through third-party travel agents are designed to at least offset the associated incremental costs. On a per-ASM basis, distribution expense was relatively flat as credit card fee rates remained stable period over period.
The following table shows our distribution channel usage:
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
Change
Website
61.0
%
 
64.2
%
 
(3.2
)
Third-party travel agents
33.5

 
27.2

 
6.3

Call center
5.5

 
8.6

 
(3.1
)

49



Maintenance, materials and repair costs increased by $10.7 million, or 21.6%, in 2013, as compared to 2012. The increase in maintenance costs is primarily due to the aging of our fleet, which requires more comprehensive work during routine scheduled maintenance, as well as the timing of the mix of maintenance checks performed during 2013 as compared to 2012. On October 15, 2013, we had an aircraft experience an engine failure shortly after takeoff. The airframe and engine incurred damage as a result of the failure. In 2013, we expensed the insurance deductible related to this incident of approximately $0.8 million. For a detailed discussion of the engine expense, please see Note 15. On a per-ASM basis, maintenance, materials and repair costs were generally flat due to the one time costs associated with the seat maintenance program we incurred in 2012.
Depreciation and amortization increased by $16.7 million, or 109.4%, primarily due to deferred heavy aircraft maintenance events, which in turn resulted in higher amortization expense recorded in 2013 compared to 2012.
Other operating expenses in 2013 increased by $16.7 million, or 13.1%, compared to 2012 primarily due to an increase in departures of 14.9% which led to increases in variable operating expenses such as ground handling and security expense. On a per-ASM basis, our other operating expenses decreased as compared to the same period in 2012. The decrease is primarily due to better operational performance during 2013 as compared to 2012 which helped drive lower passenger re-accommodation expenses. In addition, we incurred less software consulting costs related to our Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation during 2013 as compared to 2012.
Special charges (credits) for 2012 primarily include a $9.1 million gain related to the sale of four permanent air carrier slots at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA), offset by $0.6 million in secondary offering costs.

Other (income) expense, net
2014 compared to 2013
Other (income) expense, net decreased from $(0.1) million in 2013 to $2.3 million in 2014 . The decrease was primarily driven by a $7.0 million payment made to the Stockholder Representatives in accordance with the TRA of which $1.4 million was in excess of the amount previously accrued and was recorded within other (income) expense in the statement of operations. See Note 18 for additional information. In addition, we made a charitable contribution of $1.0 million that is specifically creditable against current income tax in the State of Florida, as allowed under state law, and recorded within other expense in the statements of operations.
2013 compared to 2012
Other (income) expense, net decreased from $(0.6) million in 2012 to $(0.1) million in 2013. The decrease was primarily driven by a decrease of $0.5 million of interest income year over year due to the lower interest rates year over year that we earned from our money market investments.

Income Taxes
Our effective tax rate was 36.1% compared to 37.4% in 2013 and 37.9% in 2012. While we expect our tax rate to be fairly consistent in the near term, it will tend to vary depending on recurring items such as the amount of income we earn in each state and the state tax rate applicable to such income. Discrete items particular to a given year may also affect our effective tax rates.

50



Quarterly Financial Data (unaudited)
                     
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
March 31, 2013
 
June 30,
2013

September 30, 2013

December 31, 2013

March 31, 2014

June 30,
2014

September 30, 2014

December 31, 2014
 
 
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
Total operating revenue
 
$
370,437

 
$
407,339

 
$
456,625

 
$
419,984

 
$
437,987

 
$
499,337

 
$
519,769

 
$
474,487

Passenger
 
218,897

 
241,119

 
279,499

 
246,503

 
253,878

 
302,487

 
317,038

 
271,569

Non-ticket
 
151,540

 
166,220

 
177,126

 
173,481

 
184,109

 
196,850

 
202,731

 
202,918

Operating income
 
49,669

 
66,758

 
97,804

 
68,061

 
59,953

 
105,144

 
100,191

 
89,975

Net income (loss)
 
$
30,554

 
$
42,068

 
$
61,103

 
$
43,193

 
$
37,706

 
$
64,849

 
$
67,000

 
$
55,909

Earnings Per Share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
0.42

 
$
0.58

 
$
0.84

 
$
0.59

 
$
0.52

 
$
0.89

 
$
0.92

 
$
0.77

Diluted
 
$
0.42

 
$
0.58

 
$
0.84